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Plant-based diets for dogs

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W0, Canada.
  • | 2 Petcurean, 435-44550 S Sumas Rd, Chilliwack, BC V2R 5M3, Canada.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W0, Canada.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 129 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Verbrugghe (averbrug@uoguelph.ca).