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Ambulatory electrocardiographic evaluation of the occurrence of arrhythmias in healthy Salukis

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 2 Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, England.
  • | 3 Michigan State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, 4125 Beaumont Rd, Lansing, MI 48910.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias in a group of healthy Salukis evaluated by means of continuous Holter monitoring for 7 days.

DESIGN Prospective case series.

ANIMALS 25 healthy Salukis > 18 months old.

PROCEDURES In all dogs, a history was obtained and a physical examination and transthoracic echocardiography were performed to verify the absence of structural cardiac disease. Dogs then underwent Holter monitoring for 7 days. Data recorded included heart rate parameters and the occurrence of conduction disturbances, ventricular premature complexes, ventricular couplets, ventricular triplets, ventricular bigeminy, ventricular trigeminy, and ventricular tachycardia.

RESULTS 25 dogs (13 sexually intact females, 2 spayed females, and 10 sexually intact males) were enrolled in the study. All 25 dogs had at least one 24-hour period during which ventricular premature complexes were detected. Median number of ventricular premature complexes during any 24-hour period in all dogs was 2 (interquartile [25th to 75th percentile] range, 0 to 4). There were no significant differences between males and females in regard to median number of ventricular premature complexes per 24-hour period or recorded heart rate parameters.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For Salukis in the study population, 7-day Holter monitoring revealed infrequent ventricular arrhythmias. These findings suggested that detection of a ventricular arrhythmia in a healthy Saluki may be an indication for further diagnostic evaluation.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias in a group of healthy Salukis evaluated by means of continuous Holter monitoring for 7 days.

DESIGN Prospective case series.

ANIMALS 25 healthy Salukis > 18 months old.

PROCEDURES In all dogs, a history was obtained and a physical examination and transthoracic echocardiography were performed to verify the absence of structural cardiac disease. Dogs then underwent Holter monitoring for 7 days. Data recorded included heart rate parameters and the occurrence of conduction disturbances, ventricular premature complexes, ventricular couplets, ventricular triplets, ventricular bigeminy, ventricular trigeminy, and ventricular tachycardia.

RESULTS 25 dogs (13 sexually intact females, 2 spayed females, and 10 sexually intact males) were enrolled in the study. All 25 dogs had at least one 24-hour period during which ventricular premature complexes were detected. Median number of ventricular premature complexes during any 24-hour period in all dogs was 2 (interquartile [25th to 75th percentile] range, 0 to 4). There were no significant differences between males and females in regard to median number of ventricular premature complexes per 24-hour period or recorded heart rate parameters.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For Salukis in the study population, 7-day Holter monitoring revealed infrequent ventricular arrhythmias. These findings suggested that detection of a ventricular arrhythmia in a healthy Saluki may be an indication for further diagnostic evaluation.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table s1 (PDF 30 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Sanders (ras@cvm.msu.edu).