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What Is Your Neurologic Diagnosis?

Georgios Varotsis DVM1, Elspeth Milne BVM&S, PhD2, and Katia Marioni-Henry DVM, PhD3
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  • 1 Hospital for Small Animals, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, Scotland.
  • | 2 Easter Bush Pathology, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and the Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, Scotland.
  • | 3 Hospital for Small Animals, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, Scotland.

A 9-year-old 27.1-kg (59.6-lb) neutered male Labrador Retriever was examined because of progressive lethargy, signs of pain, anorexia, pyrexia, and pelvic limb weakness of 3 days’ duration. The owner also noticed progressive weight loss during the preceding 3 months. On initial examination, the dog had a rectal temperature of 40°C (104°F), and the remainder of the physical examination findings were unremarkable. A neurologic examination was performed. Postural reactions in the right thoracic limb and both pelvic limbs were delayed; spinal reflexes were exaggerated. The dog collapsed and assumed sternal recumbency on elevation of the head.

What is the problem? Where

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Varotsis (gevarotsis@gmail.com).