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A randomized, controlled trial of the effects of resveratrol administration in performance horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints

Ashlee E. Watts DVM, PhD1, Robin Dabareiner DVM, PhD2, Chad Marsh DVM, MS3, G. Kent Carter DVM4, and Kevin J. Cummings DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 2 Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 3 Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 4 Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 5 Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of resveratrol administration in performance horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints.

DESIGN Randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS 45 client-owned horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints.

PROCEDURES All horses received injections of triamcinolone acetonide in the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints of both hind limbs. A placebo or a supplement containing resveratrol was fed twice daily by owners for 4 months. Primary outcomes were horse performance as determined by rider opinion (better, worse, or the same) and change in lameness severity from the enrollment examination.

RESULTS Complete data were obtained for 21 horses that received resveratrol and 20 that received the placebo. Percentage of riders who reported that the horse's performance was better, compared with worse or the same, was significantly higher for the resveratrol group than for the placebo group after 2 (20/21 [95%] vs 14/20 [70%]) and 4 (18/21 [86%] vs 10/20 [50%]) months. The change in A1:A2 ratio between the enrollment and 4-month recheck examinations was significantly better for horses in the resveratrol versus placebo group. However, subjective lameness scores and degree of asymmetry of pelvis movement did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that in performance horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints, injection of triamcinolone in the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints of both hind limbs followed by oral supplementation with resveratrol for 4 months resulted in reduced lameness, compared with triamcinolone injection and supplementation with a placebo.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of resveratrol administration in performance horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints.

DESIGN Randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS 45 client-owned horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints.

PROCEDURES All horses received injections of triamcinolone acetonide in the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints of both hind limbs. A placebo or a supplement containing resveratrol was fed twice daily by owners for 4 months. Primary outcomes were horse performance as determined by rider opinion (better, worse, or the same) and change in lameness severity from the enrollment examination.

RESULTS Complete data were obtained for 21 horses that received resveratrol and 20 that received the placebo. Percentage of riders who reported that the horse's performance was better, compared with worse or the same, was significantly higher for the resveratrol group than for the placebo group after 2 (20/21 [95%] vs 14/20 [70%]) and 4 (18/21 [86%] vs 10/20 [50%]) months. The change in A1:A2 ratio between the enrollment and 4-month recheck examinations was significantly better for horses in the resveratrol versus placebo group. However, subjective lameness scores and degree of asymmetry of pelvis movement did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that in performance horses with lameness localized to the distal tarsal joints, injection of triamcinolone in the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints of both hind limbs followed by oral supplementation with resveratrol for 4 months resulted in reduced lameness, compared with triamcinolone injection and supplementation with a placebo.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Appendix S1 (PDF 69 kb)

Contributor Notes

Dr. Dabareiner's present address is Waller Equine Hospital, 28234 Fm 2920 Rd, Waller, TX 77484.

Dr. Marsh's present address is Equine Sports Medicine & Surgery, 2991 Interstate 20 Frontage Rd, Weatherford, TX 76087.

Address correspondence to Dr. Watts (awatts@cvm.tamu.edu).