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Nutritional management of idiopathic epilepsy in dogs

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  • 1 Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Idiopathic epilepsy is a condition defined by chronic, nonprogressive, recurrent seizures not attributable to other specific neurologic abnormalities. Several nutritional strategies have been proposed to help control seizures in epileptic canine patients; however, research supporting these nutritional strategies is often lacking. Epileptic dogs may also have concurrent diseases or be at risk of complications caused by medications; these factors can be addressed by use of a comprehensive nutritional management plan. In addition, the effect of nutrient-drug interactions as well as the impacts of body composition and dietary consistency on the pharmacokinetics of commonly used therapeutic compounds should be considered.

Ketogenic

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Larsen (jalarsen@vmth.ucdavis.edu).