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Awareness and evaluation of natural pet food products in the United States

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  • 1 Nutro Company, 1550 W McEwen Dr, Franklin, TN 37067.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 3 Nutro Company, 1550 W McEwen Dr, Franklin, TN 37067.
  • | 4 Nutro Company, 1550 W McEwen Dr, Franklin, TN 37067.

Health- and nutrition-minded consumers have a considerable interest in and demand for natural food products, including natural foods for their pets. Natural pet food is the fastest growing segment of the pet food industry in the United States, compared with the science, grocery, and overall pet specialty segments. Sales of natural pet foods increased from $2.0 billion in 2008 to $3.9 billion in 2012.1 Interest in natural pet foods and ingredient sourcing was fueled by the 2007 recall of pet food products adulterated with melamine and related derivatives as a result of the inclusion of Chinese-sourced wheat gluten,

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Buff (preston.buff@effem.com).