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A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of autologous platelet therapy for the treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs

Maria A. Fahie DVM, DACVS1, Girolamo A. Ortolano PhD2, Vincent Guercio BS3, Jeffrey A. Schaffer DVM4, Gary Johnston DVM, DACVR5, Jennifer Au DVM, DACVS6, Bianca A. Hettlich Dr med vet, DACVS7, Tom Phillips DVM, PhD8, Matthew J. Allen Vet MB, PhD9, and Alicia L. Bertone DVM, PhD, DACVS10
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766.
  • | 2 Medical Group, Life Sciences Division, Pall Corp, 25 Harbor Park Dr, Port Washington, NY 11050.
  • | 3 Medical Group, Life Sciences Division, Pall Corp, 25 Harbor Park Dr, Port Washington, NY 11050.
  • | 4 Medical Group, Life Sciences Division, Pall Corp, 25 Harbor Park Dr, Port Washington, NY 11050.
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766.
  • | 6 Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 7 Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 8 Department of Small Animal Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766.
  • | 9 Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 10 Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To determine efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of an autologous platelet concentrate for treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs.

Design—Randomized, controlled, 2-center clinical trial.

Animals—20 client-owned dogs with osteoarthritis involving a single joint.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group. In all dogs, severity of lameness and pain was scored by owners with the Hudson visual analog scale and the University of Pennsylvania Canine Brief Pain Inventory, respectively, and peak vertical force (PVF) was determined with a force platform. Dogs in the treatment group were then sedated, and a blood sample (55 mL) was obtained. Platelets were recovered by means of a point-of-use filter and injected intra-articularly within 30 minutes. Control dogs were sedated and given an intra-articular injection of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Assessments were repeated 12 weeks after injection of platelets or saline solution.

Results—Dogs weighed between 18.3 and 63.9 kg (40.3 and 140.6 lb) and ranged from 1.5 to 8 years old. For control dogs, lameness scores, pain scores, and PVF at week 12 were not significantly different from pretreatment values. In contrast, for dogs that received platelet injections, lameness scores (55% decrease in median score), pain scores (53% decrease in median score), and PVF (12% increase in mean PVF) were significantly improved after 12 weeks, compared with pretreatment values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that a single intra-articular injection of autologous platelets resulted in significant improvements at 12 weeks in dogs with osteoarthritis involving a single joint.

Abstract

Objective—To determine efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of an autologous platelet concentrate for treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs.

Design—Randomized, controlled, 2-center clinical trial.

Animals—20 client-owned dogs with osteoarthritis involving a single joint.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group. In all dogs, severity of lameness and pain was scored by owners with the Hudson visual analog scale and the University of Pennsylvania Canine Brief Pain Inventory, respectively, and peak vertical force (PVF) was determined with a force platform. Dogs in the treatment group were then sedated, and a blood sample (55 mL) was obtained. Platelets were recovered by means of a point-of-use filter and injected intra-articularly within 30 minutes. Control dogs were sedated and given an intra-articular injection of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Assessments were repeated 12 weeks after injection of platelets or saline solution.

Results—Dogs weighed between 18.3 and 63.9 kg (40.3 and 140.6 lb) and ranged from 1.5 to 8 years old. For control dogs, lameness scores, pain scores, and PVF at week 12 were not significantly different from pretreatment values. In contrast, for dogs that received platelet injections, lameness scores (55% decrease in median score), pain scores (53% decrease in median score), and PVF (12% increase in mean PVF) were significantly improved after 12 weeks, compared with pretreatment values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that a single intra-articular injection of autologous platelets resulted in significant improvements at 12 weeks in dogs with osteoarthritis involving a single joint.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by the Pall Corp.

Presented in abstract form at the 39th Annual Congress of the Veterinary Orthopedic Society, Crested Butte, Colo, March 2012; and at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons Annual Symposium, National Harbor, Md, October 2012.

The authors thank Dr. Akikazu Ishihara for data compilation; Nicole Stingle for study coordination; Dr. Marc Togneri, Dr. David Clark, and Kimberly Holt for study participation; and Dr. Michael P. Kowaleski for serving as a scientific advisor.

Address correspondence to Dr. Bertone (alicia.bertone@cvm.osu.edu).