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Comparison of lateral fabellar suture and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy techniques for treatment of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease

Wanda J. Gordon-Evans DVM, PhD, DACVS1, Dominique J. Griffon DVM, PhD, DACVS2, Carrie Bubb3, Kim M. Knap4, Meghan Sullivan DVM, DACVS5, and Richard B. Evans Phd6,7
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  • 1 Wisconsin Veterinary Referral Center, 360 Bluemound Rd, Waukesha, WI 53188.
  • | 2 Department of Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766.
  • | 3 College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 4 College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 5 VCA Boston Road Animal Hospital, 1235 Boston Rd, Springfield, MA 01119.
  • | 6 Evans Statistical Consulting, s67 w28303 River Rd, Waukesha, WI 53189.
  • | 7 Performed at University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

Abstract

Objective—To compare 1-year outcomes after lateral fabellar suture stabilization (LFS) and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for the treatment of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Design—Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial.

Animals—80 dogs with naturally occurring unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Procedures—All dogs were randomly assigned to undergo LFS (n = 40) or TPLO (40). Clinical data collected included age, weight, body condition score, history information, stifle joint instability, radiographic findings, surgical findings, and complications. Outcome measures were determined prior to surgery and at 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months after surgery, including values of pressure platform gait analysis variables, Canine Brief Pain Inventory scores, owner satisfaction ratings, thigh circumference, and stifle joint goniometry values.

Results—Signalment and data for possible confounding variables were similar between groups. Peak vertical force of affected hind limbs at a walk and trot was 5% to 11% higher for dogs in the TPLO group versus those in the LFS group during the 12 months after surgery. Canine Brief Pain Inventory, goniometry, and thigh circumference results indicated dogs in both groups improved after surgery, but significant differences between groups were not detected. Owner satisfaction ratings at 12 months after surgery were significantly different between groups; 93% and 75% of owners of dogs in the TPLO and LFS groups indicated a satisfaction score ≥ 9 (scale, 1 to 10), respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Kinematic and owner satisfaction results indicated dogs that underwent TPLO had better outcomes than those that underwent LFS.

Abstract

Objective—To compare 1-year outcomes after lateral fabellar suture stabilization (LFS) and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for the treatment of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Design—Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial.

Animals—80 dogs with naturally occurring unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Procedures—All dogs were randomly assigned to undergo LFS (n = 40) or TPLO (40). Clinical data collected included age, weight, body condition score, history information, stifle joint instability, radiographic findings, surgical findings, and complications. Outcome measures were determined prior to surgery and at 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months after surgery, including values of pressure platform gait analysis variables, Canine Brief Pain Inventory scores, owner satisfaction ratings, thigh circumference, and stifle joint goniometry values.

Results—Signalment and data for possible confounding variables were similar between groups. Peak vertical force of affected hind limbs at a walk and trot was 5% to 11% higher for dogs in the TPLO group versus those in the LFS group during the 12 months after surgery. Canine Brief Pain Inventory, goniometry, and thigh circumference results indicated dogs in both groups improved after surgery, but significant differences between groups were not detected. Owner satisfaction ratings at 12 months after surgery were significantly different between groups; 93% and 75% of owners of dogs in the TPLO and LFS groups indicated a satisfaction score ≥ 9 (scale, 1 to 10), respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Kinematic and owner satisfaction results indicated dogs that underwent TPLO had better outcomes than those that underwent LFS.

Contributor Notes

Funded by the Morris Animal Foundation.

Presented in abstract form at the Veterinary Orthopedic Society Symposium, Park City, Utah, March 2013, and as an abstact in the proceedings of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons Symposium, National Harbor, Md, November 2012.

Address correspondence to Dr. Gordon-Evans (wgordonevans@gmail.com).