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  • 1. Goldman AL, De Witt W, Scheftel J, et al. AVMA governance changes [lett]. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013; 243:1100.

  • 2. AVMA. AVMA Governance Engagement Team. Available at: www.avma.org/About/Governance/Pages/AVMA_Governance_Engagement_Team.aspx. Accessed Oct 15, 2013.

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Letters to the Editor

Feral cat management

We applaud McCarthy et al1 for their research addressing a critical issue in feral cat management. We concur that feral and free-roaming cats pose myriad problems for people and the environment. However, we believe that the authors overlooked several important factors when concluding that trap-vasectomy-hysterectomy-release (TVHR) “should be recommended as a humane and more effective method of decreasing population size.”

First, the population model used in the study does not represent a typical managed feral cat colony. Inclusion of self-imposed restraints on colony size attributable to a hypothetical carrying capacity restricts the population from reacting