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Safety and efficacy of spinosad chewable tablets for treatment of flea infestations of cats

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  • 1 Elanco Animal Health, 2500 Innovation Way, Greenfield, IN 46140.
  • | 2 Elanco Animal Health, Lilly House, Priestley Rd, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG24 9NL, England.
  • | 3 Elanco Animal Health, 2500 Innovation Way, Greenfield, IN 46140.
  • | 4 Elanco Animal Health, 2500 Innovation Way, Greenfield, IN 46140.
  • | 5 Elanco Animal Health, 2500 Innovation Way, Greenfield, IN 46140.

Abstract

Objective—To compare safety and efficacy of spinosad and selamectin and determine effects of those products on flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) in cats.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—211 client-owned cats.

Procedures—Cats with ≥ 5 fleas evaluated at 8 veterinary clinics were allocated to receive spinosad (50 to 100 mg/kg [22.7 to 45.5 mg/lb], PO; n = 139) or selamectin (≥ 6 mg/kg [≥ 2.7 mg/lb], topically; 72) once per month. Flea comb counts and FAD scores were determined on day −1, between days 27 and 33, and between days 85 and 95 (evaluations 1, 2, and 3, respectively); day 0 was the first day of drug administration.

Results—The most common adverse event was vomiting (14.3% and 2.4% of spinosad- and selamectin-treated cats, respectively). Evaluation 2 and 3 geometric mean flea counts for spinosad-treated cats were significantly lower than those for selamectin-treated cats. Percentage reductions in flea counts for the spinosad and selamectin groups were 97.5% and 88.8% (evaluation 2) and 99.3% and 97.7% (evaluation 3), respectively. At evaluations 2 and 3, 70.6% and 92.6% of spinosad-treated cats and 29.4% and 64.7% of selamectin-treated cats were free of fleas, respectively. Weighted FAD scores for spinosad- and selamectin-treated cats decreased 94.2% and 80.0% during the study, respectively. Spinosad tablets were successfully administered during 98.1% of treatments.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study indicated spinosad and selamectin both reduced flea counts and FAD scores for cats, although spinosad was more effective. Monthly oral administration of spinosad may be practical for treatment of flea infestations and FAD in cats.

Abstract

Objective—To compare safety and efficacy of spinosad and selamectin and determine effects of those products on flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) in cats.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—211 client-owned cats.

Procedures—Cats with ≥ 5 fleas evaluated at 8 veterinary clinics were allocated to receive spinosad (50 to 100 mg/kg [22.7 to 45.5 mg/lb], PO; n = 139) or selamectin (≥ 6 mg/kg [≥ 2.7 mg/lb], topically; 72) once per month. Flea comb counts and FAD scores were determined on day −1, between days 27 and 33, and between days 85 and 95 (evaluations 1, 2, and 3, respectively); day 0 was the first day of drug administration.

Results—The most common adverse event was vomiting (14.3% and 2.4% of spinosad- and selamectin-treated cats, respectively). Evaluation 2 and 3 geometric mean flea counts for spinosad-treated cats were significantly lower than those for selamectin-treated cats. Percentage reductions in flea counts for the spinosad and selamectin groups were 97.5% and 88.8% (evaluation 2) and 99.3% and 97.7% (evaluation 3), respectively. At evaluations 2 and 3, 70.6% and 92.6% of spinosad-treated cats and 29.4% and 64.7% of selamectin-treated cats were free of fleas, respectively. Weighted FAD scores for spinosad- and selamectin-treated cats decreased 94.2% and 80.0% during the study, respectively. Spinosad tablets were successfully administered during 98.1% of treatments.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study indicated spinosad and selamectin both reduced flea counts and FAD scores for cats, although spinosad was more effective. Monthly oral administration of spinosad may be practical for treatment of flea infestations and FAD in cats.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Elanco Animal Health.

Address correspondence to Dr. Snyder (Snyder_Daniel_E@Lilly.com).