• 1 LaRue SM, Withrow SJ, Powers BE, et al. Limb-sparing treatment for osteosarcomas in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1989; 195:17341744.

  • 2 Alden CL, Helzer LL. Humeral chondrosarcoma. Mod Vet Pract 1981; 62:214216.

  • 3 Durham AC, Popovitch CA, Goldschmidt MH. Feline chondrosarcoma: a retrospective study of 67 cases. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2008; 44:124130.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4 Turrel JM, Pool RR. Primary bone tumors in the cat. Vet Radiol 1982; 23:152166.

  • 5 Liptak JM, Dernell WS, et al. Canine appendicular osteosarcoma: curative-intent treatment. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 2004; 26:186197.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6 Dernall WS, Ehrhart NP, Straw RC, et al. Tumors of the skeletal system. In: Withrow SJ, Vail DM, eds. Withrow & MacEwen's small animal clinical oncology. 4th ed. St Louis: Saunders Elsevier, 2007;540582.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7 Kuntz CA, Asselin TL, Dernell WS, et al. Limb salvage surgery for osteosarcoma of the proximal humerus: outcome in 17 dogs. Vet Surg 1998; 27:417422.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8 MacDonald TL, Schiller TD. Limb-sparing surgery using tantalum metal endoprosthesis in a dog with osteosarcoma of the distal radius. Can Vet J 2010; 51:497500.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9 Straw RC, Withrow SJ. Limb-sparing surgery versus amputation for dogs with bone tumours. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 1996; 26:135143.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10 Norton C, Drenan CM, Emms SG. Subtotal scapulectomy as the treatment for scapular tumour in the dog: a report of 6 cases. Aust Vet J 2006; 84:364366.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11 Kirpensteijn J, Straw RC, Pardo AD. Total and partial scapulectomy in the dog. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1994; 30:313319.

  • 12 Hermanson JW, Evans HE. The muscular system. In: Evans HE, ed. Miller's anatomy of the dog. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Saunders, 1993;258384.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13 Hoerlein BF, Evans LE, Davis JM. Upward luxation of the canine scapula—a case report. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1960; 136:258259.

  • 14 Trout NJ, Pavletic MM, Kraus KH. Partial scapulectomy for management of sarcomas in three dogs and two cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1995; 207:585587.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Total scapulectomy for the treatment of chondrosarcoma in a cat

Ben S. Clarke BVSc1 and Laurent Findji DMV, MS2
View More View Less
  • 1 VRCC Veterinary Referrals, 1 Bramston Way, Laindon, Essex, England.
  • | 2 VRCC Veterinary Referrals, 1 Bramston Way, Laindon, Essex, England.

Abstract

Case Description—A 10-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was admitted for treatment of a mass affecting the right scapula.

Clinical Findings—A firm soft tissue mass located over the craniolateral aspect of the right scapula was evident during palpation. The mass extended close to the shoulder joint but did not cause lameness of the affected limb.

Treatment and Outcome—Examination of a biopsy specimen obtained from the mass ndicated chondrosarcoma. Total scapulectomy was performed to allow wide excision of the tumor. Weight bearing on the operated limb was tolerated 12 hours after surgery. Six months after surgery, limb function was assessed and considered excellent. The owner reported that the cat had its typical amount of activity and was able to jump and play normally. No recurrence of the tumor was evident 6 months after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—On the basis of the functional outcome after surgery, total scapulectomy may be a viable limb-sparing technique for the treatment of local neoplasms in cats. Subtotal scapulectomy has been reported previously, with a good to excellent clinical outcome expected. Total scapulectomy associated with only a fair clinical outcome has been reported previously, which has led to the general recommendation that scapulectomy be performed with preservation of the shoulder joint. The information provided in this report revealed that total scapulectomy can be associated with an excellent outcome in a cat.

Abstract

Case Description—A 10-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was admitted for treatment of a mass affecting the right scapula.

Clinical Findings—A firm soft tissue mass located over the craniolateral aspect of the right scapula was evident during palpation. The mass extended close to the shoulder joint but did not cause lameness of the affected limb.

Treatment and Outcome—Examination of a biopsy specimen obtained from the mass ndicated chondrosarcoma. Total scapulectomy was performed to allow wide excision of the tumor. Weight bearing on the operated limb was tolerated 12 hours after surgery. Six months after surgery, limb function was assessed and considered excellent. The owner reported that the cat had its typical amount of activity and was able to jump and play normally. No recurrence of the tumor was evident 6 months after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—On the basis of the functional outcome after surgery, total scapulectomy may be a viable limb-sparing technique for the treatment of local neoplasms in cats. Subtotal scapulectomy has been reported previously, with a good to excellent clinical outcome expected. Total scapulectomy associated with only a fair clinical outcome has been reported previously, which has led to the general recommendation that scapulectomy be performed with preservation of the shoulder joint. The information provided in this report revealed that total scapulectomy can be associated with an excellent outcome in a cat.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Clarke's present address is North Coast Veterinary Specialists, 431 Tanawha Tourist Dr, Tanawha, QLD 4556, Australia.

Address correspondence to Dr. Clarke (benclarke01@hotmail.com).