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Antitumor effects of deracoxib treatment in 26 dogs with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

Sarah K. McMillan DVM1, Pedro Boria DVM, MS, DACVIM2, George E. Moore DVM, PhD, DACVPM, DACVIM3, William R. Widmer DVM, MS, DACVR4, Patty L. Bonney BS5, and Deborah W. Knapp DVM, MS, DACVIM6,7
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 3 Department of Comparative Pathobiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 7 School of Veterinary Medicine, and the Center for Cancer Research, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxic effects of deracoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—26 client-owned dogs with naturally occurring, histologically confirmed, measurableTCC of the urinary bladder.

Procedures—Dogs were treated PO with deracoxib at a dosage of 3 mg/kg/d (1.36 mg/lb/d) as a single-agent treatment for TCC. Tumor response was assessed via radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and ultrasonographic mapping of urinary bladder masses. Toxic effects of deracoxib administration in dogs were assessed through clinical observations and hematologic and biochemical analyses.

Results—Of 24 dogs for which tumor response was assessed, 4 (17%) had partial remission, 17 (71%) had stable disease, and 3 (13%) had progressive disease; initial response could not be assessed in 2 of 26 dogs. The median survival time was 323 days. Median time to progressive disease was 133 days. Renal, hepatic, and gastrointestinal abnormalities attributed to deracoxib administration were noted in 4% (1/26), 4% (1/26), and 19% (5/26) of dogs, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that deracoxib was generally well tolerated by dogs and had antitumor activity against TCC.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxic effects of deracoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—26 client-owned dogs with naturally occurring, histologically confirmed, measurableTCC of the urinary bladder.

Procedures—Dogs were treated PO with deracoxib at a dosage of 3 mg/kg/d (1.36 mg/lb/d) as a single-agent treatment for TCC. Tumor response was assessed via radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and ultrasonographic mapping of urinary bladder masses. Toxic effects of deracoxib administration in dogs were assessed through clinical observations and hematologic and biochemical analyses.

Results—Of 24 dogs for which tumor response was assessed, 4 (17%) had partial remission, 17 (71%) had stable disease, and 3 (13%) had progressive disease; initial response could not be assessed in 2 of 26 dogs. The median survival time was 323 days. Median time to progressive disease was 133 days. Renal, hepatic, and gastrointestinal abnormalities attributed to deracoxib administration were noted in 4% (1/26), 4% (1/26), and 19% (5/26) of dogs, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that deracoxib was generally well tolerated by dogs and had antitumor activity against TCC.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Boria's present address is Vet Specialists Consultants, 5152 Grove Ave, Lorain, OH 44055.

Supported in part by Novartis Animal Health Incorporated, Greensboro, NC.

Presented in part at the 23rd Annual Veterinary Cancer Society Conference, Madison, Wis, September 2003, and at the 8th Annual American Association for Cancer Research Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, Houston, December 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. Knapp (knappd@purdue.edu).