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Evaluation and comparison of outcomes in dogs with periarticular and nonperiarticular histiocytic sarcoma

Shawna L. Klahn DVM1, Barbara E. Kitchell DVM, PhD, DACVIM2, and Nikolaos G. Dervisis DVM, PhD, DACVIM3
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and compare the outcomes of dogs with periarticular histiocytic sarcoma (PAHS) and histiocytic sarcoma of other anatomic locations (non-PAHS) and identify factors associated with outcome for dogs with PAHS.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—19 dogs with PAHS and 31 dogs with non-PAHS.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with histiocytic sarcoma that underwent definitive local treatment (surgery or radiation), chemotherapy, or a combination of these were reviewed. Patient signalment, clinical signs, staging test results, clinicopathologic data, type of treatment, response, and outcome were collected, and potential risk factors in dogs with PAHS were identified and analyzed for an association with outcome.

Results—Dogs with PAHS lived significantly longer than did dogs with non-PAHS, with an overall median survival times of 391 (range, 48 to 980) and 128 (range, 14 to 918) days, respectively, despite the presence of suspected metastasis at diagnosis in 13 of 19 dogs with PAHS. Dogs with PAHS without evidence of metastasis at diagnosis lived significantly longer than did dogs with PAHS with evidence of metastasis, with median survival times of 980 (range, 83 to 980) and 253 (range, 48 to 441) days, respectively. Administration of prednisone in dogs with PAHS was associated with a significantly shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) and increased risk of tumor progression and death.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that dogs with PAHS may have a favorable outcome independent of metastatic status when treated with chemotherapy or aggressive multimodal treatment. The concurrent administration of prednisone may be a negative predictive factor for survival time and TTP in dogs with PAHS.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and compare the outcomes of dogs with periarticular histiocytic sarcoma (PAHS) and histiocytic sarcoma of other anatomic locations (non-PAHS) and identify factors associated with outcome for dogs with PAHS.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—19 dogs with PAHS and 31 dogs with non-PAHS.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with histiocytic sarcoma that underwent definitive local treatment (surgery or radiation), chemotherapy, or a combination of these were reviewed. Patient signalment, clinical signs, staging test results, clinicopathologic data, type of treatment, response, and outcome were collected, and potential risk factors in dogs with PAHS were identified and analyzed for an association with outcome.

Results—Dogs with PAHS lived significantly longer than did dogs with non-PAHS, with an overall median survival times of 391 (range, 48 to 980) and 128 (range, 14 to 918) days, respectively, despite the presence of suspected metastasis at diagnosis in 13 of 19 dogs with PAHS. Dogs with PAHS without evidence of metastasis at diagnosis lived significantly longer than did dogs with PAHS with evidence of metastasis, with median survival times of 980 (range, 83 to 980) and 253 (range, 48 to 441) days, respectively. Administration of prednisone in dogs with PAHS was associated with a significantly shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) and increased risk of tumor progression and death.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that dogs with PAHS may have a favorable outcome independent of metastatic status when treated with chemotherapy or aggressive multimodal treatment. The concurrent administration of prednisone may be a negative predictive factor for survival time and TTP in dogs with PAHS.

Contributor Notes

Presented in part as an oral presentation at the 29th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Cancer Society, Austin, Tex, October 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. Klahn (klahn@cvm.msu.edu).