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Guidelines for prevention of leishmaniasis in dogs

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  • 1 Vector-borne Diseases & International Health Unit, MIPI Department, National Institute of Health, Viale Regina Elena, 00161 Rome, Italy.
  • | 2 Vector-borne Diseases & International Health Unit, MIPI Department, National Institute of Health, Viale Regina Elena, 00161 Rome, Italy.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Naples, 80137 Naples, Italy.
  • | 4 Department of Public Health, Comparative Pathology & Veterinary Hygiene, University of Padua, 35020 Legnaro, Italy.
  • | 5 Associated Veterinary Clinic, Via P. Revelli Beaumont 43, 16143 Genoa, Italy.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinic, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Pathology, Hygiene and Public Health, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy.
  • | 8 Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08007 Barcelona, Spain.
  • | 9 Clinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, University of Zurich, CH 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 10 Veterinary Clinic Pirani, Via Majakowski 2/L,M,N, 42100 Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Human infections with Leishmania protozoan parasites, transmitted by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies, cause visceral, cutaneous, or mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Eighty-eight countries are affected, with > 2 million new infections worldwide each year.1 The most severe disease forms are anthroponotic VL due to Leishmania donovani in the Indian subcontinent and parts of central Asia and Africa and zoonotic VL due to Leishmania infantum (Leishmania chagasi) in the Mediterranean, parts of Asia, and Latin America.

Domestic dogs are the only confirmed domestic reservoir of zoonotic VL.2 Reports3–5

Contributor Notes

Supported by Hill's Pet Nutrition Incorporated.

All authors contributed equally to the study.

Address correspondence to Dr. Maroli (michele.maroli@gmail.com).