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An evidence-based review of the use of nutraceuticals and dietary supplementation for the management of obese and overweight pets

Philip Roudebush DVM, DACVIM1, William D. Schoenherr PhD2, and Sean J. Delaney DVM, MS, DACVN3
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  • 1 Scientific Affairs, Hill's Pet Nutrition Inc, PO Box 148, Topeka, KS 66601
  • | 2 Pet Nutrition Center, Hill's Pet Nutrition Inc, PO Box 1658, Topeka, KS 66601
  • | 3 Davis Veterinary Medical Consulting PC, 707 Fourth St, Ste 307, Davis, CA 95616.

Successful treatment and prevention of overweight and obese cats and dogs require a multidimensional approach to ensure causes or exacerbating factors are identified and eliminated, professional examination and care are provided on a regular basis, and a comprehensive management program is planned and implemented. Over the years, many therapeutic and preventive interventions have been developed or advocated for obese animals, but evidence of effectiveness is often lacking or highly variable. Accordingly, the primary objective of the information reported here was to identify and critically appraise the evidence supporting various aspects of managing obese and overweight pet animals.

Obesity

Obesity in

Contributor Notes

Dr. Delaney's present address is Natura Pet Products Inc, 707 Fourth St, Ste 307, Davis, CA 95616.

Address correspondence to Dr. Roudebush.