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Responses of dogs to dietary omega-3 fatty acids

John E. Bauer DVM, PhD, DACVN1
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474.

Contributor Notes

The author thanks Drs. Mark K. Waldron and Steven S. Hannah for contributions to several of the described studies.