• 1

    Hedlund C. Brachycephalic syndrome. In:Bojrab MJ, ed.Current techniques in small animal surgery. 4th ed.Baltimore: The Williams & Wilkins Co, 1998;358362.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Harvey CE. Upper airway obstruction surgery. II. Soft palate resection in brachycephalic dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1982;18:538544.

  • 3

    Harvey CE. Upper airway obstruction surgery. I. Stenotic nares surgery in brachycephalic dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1982;18:535537.

  • 4

    Harvey CE. Upper airway obstruction surgery. III. Everted laryngeal saccules surgery in brachycephalic dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1982;18:545547.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Lorinson D, Bright RM, White RS. Brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome—a review of 118 cases. Canine Pract 1997;22 (5–6):1821.

  • 6

    Torrez CV, Hunt GB. Results of surgical correction of abnormalities associated with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome in dogs in Australia. J Small Anim Pract 2006;47:150154.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Pink JJ, Doyle RS, Hughes JL, et al. Laryngeal collapse in seven brachycephalic puppies. J Small Anim Pract 2006;47:131135.

  • 8

    Poncet CM, Dupre GP, Freiche VG, et al. Prevalence of gastrointestinal tract lesions in 73 brachycephalic dogs with upper respiratory syndrome. J Small Anim Pract 2005;46:273279.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    Davidson EB, Davis MS, Campbell GA, et al. Evaluation of carbon dioxide laser and conventional incisional techniques for resection of soft palates in brachycephalic dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:776781.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Coyne BE, Fingland RB. Hypoplasia of the trachea in dogs: 103 cases (1974–1990). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992;201:768772.

  • 11

    Hobson HP. Brachycephalic syndrome. Semin Vet Med Surg Small Anim Pract 1995;10:109114.

  • 12

    Monet E. Brachycephalic airway syndrome. In:Slatter D, ed.Textbook of small animal surgery. 3rd ed.Philadelphia: Saunders, 2003;808813.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Bright RM, Wheaton LG. A modified surgical technique for elongated soft palate in dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1983;9:288292.

  • 14

    Clark GN, Sinibaldi KR. Use of carbon dioxide laser for treatment of elongated soft palate in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1994;204:17791781.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15

    Wykes PM. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Prob Vet Med 1991;3:188197.

  • 16

    Hendricks JC. Brachycephalic airway syndrome. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 1992;22:11451153.

  • 17

    Leonard HC. Collapse of the larynx and adjacent structures in the dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1960;137:360363.

  • 18

    Koch DA, Arnold S, Hubler M, et al. Brachycephalic syndrome in dogs. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 2003;25:4855.

  • 19

    Ohnishi T, Ogura JH. Partitioning of pulmonary resistance in the dog. Laryngoscope 1969;79:18471878.

Advertisement

Surgical correction of brachycephalic syndrome in dogs: 62 cases (1991–2004)

View More View Less
  • 1 MedVet & Associates Ltd, 300 E Wilson Bridge Rd, Columbus, OH 43085
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Center for Biostatistics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To assess results of surgical correction of brachycephalic syndrome (including stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules) in dogs and determine whether dogs with hypoplastic trachea have a less favorable long-term outcome.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—62 dogs with brachycephalic syndrome.

Procedures—Medical records from 1991 to 2004 were reviewed for information regarding signalment, clinical signs, diagnosis, surgery, and long-term outcome. Surgical outcome was rated by owners as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Common abnormalities, treatments, and long-term outcomes among the 62 dogs were assessed.

Results—Predominantly affected breeds included English Bulldog, Pug, and Boston Terrier. Elongated soft palate was the most common abnormality (54/62 [87.1%] dogs); the most common combination of abnormalities was elongated soft palate, stenotic nares, and everted saccules (16/62 [25.8%] dogs). The English Bulldog was the most common breed for all abnormalities, including elongated soft palate (27/54 [50%] dogs), stenotic nares (14/36 [38.9%] dogs), everted saccules (20/36 [55.6%] dogs), hypoplastic trachea (7/13 [53.9%] dogs), and laryngeal collapse (2/5 [40%]). No dogs had everted saccules alone. Outcome did not differ between dogs under-going staphylectomy by use of laser or scissor resection. Follow-up information was obtained for 34 dogs; 16 (47.1%) had an excellent outcome, and 16 (47.1%) had a good outcome. Overall treatment success rate was 94.2%, and overall mortality rate was 3.2%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Surgical treatment of brachycephalic syndrome in dogs appeared to be associated with a favorable long-term outcome, regardless of age, breed, specific diagnoses, or number and combinations of diagnoses.

Abstract

Objective—To assess results of surgical correction of brachycephalic syndrome (including stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules) in dogs and determine whether dogs with hypoplastic trachea have a less favorable long-term outcome.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—62 dogs with brachycephalic syndrome.

Procedures—Medical records from 1991 to 2004 were reviewed for information regarding signalment, clinical signs, diagnosis, surgery, and long-term outcome. Surgical outcome was rated by owners as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Common abnormalities, treatments, and long-term outcomes among the 62 dogs were assessed.

Results—Predominantly affected breeds included English Bulldog, Pug, and Boston Terrier. Elongated soft palate was the most common abnormality (54/62 [87.1%] dogs); the most common combination of abnormalities was elongated soft palate, stenotic nares, and everted saccules (16/62 [25.8%] dogs). The English Bulldog was the most common breed for all abnormalities, including elongated soft palate (27/54 [50%] dogs), stenotic nares (14/36 [38.9%] dogs), everted saccules (20/36 [55.6%] dogs), hypoplastic trachea (7/13 [53.9%] dogs), and laryngeal collapse (2/5 [40%]). No dogs had everted saccules alone. Outcome did not differ between dogs under-going staphylectomy by use of laser or scissor resection. Follow-up information was obtained for 34 dogs; 16 (47.1%) had an excellent outcome, and 16 (47.1%) had a good outcome. Overall treatment success rate was 94.2%, and overall mortality rate was 3.2%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Surgical treatment of brachycephalic syndrome in dogs appeared to be associated with a favorable long-term outcome, regardless of age, breed, specific diagnoses, or number and combinations of diagnoses.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Riecks' present address is Colorado Canine Orthopedics, 5520 N Nevada Ave, Ste 100, Colorado Springs, CO 80918.

Supported by The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine Research Funds.

The authors thank Heather Mitchell, Barbara Jenne, and Roselle Abyad for collection and processing of data.

Address correspondence to Dr. Riecks.