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Evaluation of intracranial meningioma resection with a surgical aspirator in dogs: 17 cases (1996–2004)

Justin J. Greco DVM1, Sean A. Aiken DVM, MS, DACVS2, Jason M. Berg DVM, DACVIM3, Sebastien Monette DVM, MVSc, DACVP4, and Philip J. Bergman DVM, PhD, DACVIM5
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  • 1 Department of Surgery, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021
  • | 2 Veterinary Specialty Hospital San Diego, 10435 Sorrento Valley Rd, San Diego, CA 92121
  • | 3 County Animal Specialty Group, 1574 Central Park Ave, Yonkers, NY 10710
  • | 4 Department of Pathology, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021
  • | 5 Donaldson-Atwood Cancer Clinic, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of intracranial meningioma resection by use of a surgical aspirator and assess prognostic factors associated with intracranial meningiomas in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—17 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent resection of an intracranial meningioma by use of a surgical aspirator were reviewed. Information pertaining to signalment, imaging findings, clinical signs, duration of clinical signs, preoperative treatment, location of the tumor, results of histologic assessment, outcome, and necropsy results was obtained from the medical record. Clients and referring veterinarians were contacted via telephone for information on recurrence of clinical signs and postoperative survival time.

Results—16 dogs were > 7 years of age, and all 17 dogs had seizures before surgery. The most commonly affected breed was the Golden Retriever, represented by 6 of the 17 dogs. Median survival time was 1,254 days. Of the data collected, only histologic subtype of the tumor was prognostic. Analysis of survival times according to histologic tumor subtypes indicated that the order from most brief to longest was as follows: anaplastic, 0 days; fibroblastic, 10 days; psammomatous, > 313 days; meningothelial, > 523 days; and transitional, 1,254 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of a surgical aspirator to resect intracranial meningiomas in dogs was associated with longer survival times than those achieved with traditional surgery alone or traditional surgery combined with radiation therapy. Dogs with meningothelial, psammomatous, or transitional intracranial meningioma subtypes appeared to have a better prognosis than dogs with other subtypes of meningioma.

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of intracranial meningioma resection by use of a surgical aspirator and assess prognostic factors associated with intracranial meningiomas in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—17 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent resection of an intracranial meningioma by use of a surgical aspirator were reviewed. Information pertaining to signalment, imaging findings, clinical signs, duration of clinical signs, preoperative treatment, location of the tumor, results of histologic assessment, outcome, and necropsy results was obtained from the medical record. Clients and referring veterinarians were contacted via telephone for information on recurrence of clinical signs and postoperative survival time.

Results—16 dogs were > 7 years of age, and all 17 dogs had seizures before surgery. The most commonly affected breed was the Golden Retriever, represented by 6 of the 17 dogs. Median survival time was 1,254 days. Of the data collected, only histologic subtype of the tumor was prognostic. Analysis of survival times according to histologic tumor subtypes indicated that the order from most brief to longest was as follows: anaplastic, 0 days; fibroblastic, 10 days; psammomatous, > 313 days; meningothelial, > 523 days; and transitional, 1,254 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of a surgical aspirator to resect intracranial meningiomas in dogs was associated with longer survival times than those achieved with traditional surgery alone or traditional surgery combined with radiation therapy. Dogs with meningothelial, psammomatous, or transitional intracranial meningioma subtypes appeared to have a better prognosis than dogs with other subtypes of meningioma.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Greco.