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Risk factors associated with clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease in indoor-housed cats

C. A. Tony Buffington DVM, PhD, DACVN1,2, Jodi L. Westropp DVM, PhD, DACVIM3, Dennis J. Chew DVM, DACVIM4, and Roger R. Bolus PhD5
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women's Health, 11301 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90073.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 5 UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women's Health, 11301 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90073.

Abstract

Objective—To determine associations between environmental and cat-related factors and lower urinary tract signs in indoor-housed domestic cats.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—238 healthy cats, 157 cats with clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease, and 70 cats with other diseases.

Procedure—Data collected from owners of the cats were analyzed. Descriptive statistics, environmental variables, and physical and behavioral signs were analyzed by use of ANOVA and logistic regression analysis to assess which factors were associated with clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease.

Results—The only demographic or environmental factors associated with lower urinary tract signs were older age and months owned. In contrast, cats with clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease had significantly greater owner-observed gastrointestinal tract signs and scratching, fearful, nervous, and aggressive behaviors.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lower urinary tract signs in indoor-housed cats may be more closely associated with cat-related factors than with demographic or environmental factors.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Westropp's present address is Department of Veterinary Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Supported by a grant from the Kenneth A. Scott Charitable Trust, and National Institutes of Health grant DK64539 (Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women's Health, Los Angeles).

The authors thank N. R. Baldwin for technical assistance.

Dr. Buffington.