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Association between cribbing and entrapment of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen in horses: 68 cases (1991–2002)

Debra C. Archer BVMS1, David E. Freeman MVB, PhD, DACVS2, Aimie J. Doyle DVM3, Christopher J. Proudman VetMB, PhD4, and G. Barrie Edwards BVSc, Dr Vet med5
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  • 1 Philip Leverhulme Large Animal Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, Wirral CH64 7TE, UK.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 4 Philip Leverhulme Large Animal Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, Wirral CH64 7TE, UK.
  • | 5 Philip Leverhulme Large Animal Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, Wirral CH64 7TE, UK.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether there was an association between a history of cribbing and epiploic foramen entrapment (EFE) of the small intestine in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—68 horses examined at the University of Illinois or the University of Liverpool veterinary teaching hospitals.

Procedure—For horses examined at the University of Illinois that underwent surgery because of strangulating small intestine lesions, information about cribbing was obtained through telephone calls with owners. For horses examined at the University of Liverpool that underwent surgery for colic for any reason, information about cribbing was obtained through a preoperative questionnaire.

Results—13 of 19 (68%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Illinois had a history of cribbing, compared with only 2 of 34 (6%) horses with other strangulating small intestine lesions (odds ratio, 34.7; 95% confidence interval, 6.2 to 194.6). Similarly, 24 of 49 (49%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Liverpool had a history of cribbing, compared with 72 of 687 (10.5%) horses with colic caused by other lesions (odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval, 4.5 to 15.1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that there may be an association between cribbing and EFE in horses, with horses with a history of cribbing more likely to have EFE than horses without such a history. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:562–564)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether there was an association between a history of cribbing and epiploic foramen entrapment (EFE) of the small intestine in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—68 horses examined at the University of Illinois or the University of Liverpool veterinary teaching hospitals.

Procedure—For horses examined at the University of Illinois that underwent surgery because of strangulating small intestine lesions, information about cribbing was obtained through telephone calls with owners. For horses examined at the University of Liverpool that underwent surgery for colic for any reason, information about cribbing was obtained through a preoperative questionnaire.

Results—13 of 19 (68%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Illinois had a history of cribbing, compared with only 2 of 34 (6%) horses with other strangulating small intestine lesions (odds ratio, 34.7; 95% confidence interval, 6.2 to 194.6). Similarly, 24 of 49 (49%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Liverpool had a history of cribbing, compared with 72 of 687 (10.5%) horses with colic caused by other lesions (odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval, 4.5 to 15.1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that there may be an association between cribbing and EFE in horses, with horses with a history of cribbing more likely to have EFE than horses without such a history. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:562–564)