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Effects of leukoreduction on N-methylhistamine concentration in stored units of canine whole blood

Mariah J. Frank DVM1, Mohammad R. Khattab MVSC, PhD3, Robert W. Wills DVM, PhD2, Todd M. Archer DVM, MS2, Andrew J. Mackin BVMS, DVSc2, Jan S. Suchodolski Dr Med Vet, PhD3, Jonathan A. Lidbury BVMS, PhD3, Joerg M. Steiner Dr Med Vet, PhD3, Alyssa M. Sullivant DVM, MS2, and John M. Thomason DVM, MS2
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  • 1 From the Atlantic Veterinary Internal Medicine and Oncology Hospital, Towson, MD 21286;
  • | 2 Departments of Comparative Biomedical Sciences and Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762;
  • | 3 Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of leukoreduction on N-methylhistamine (NMH; a stable histamine metabolite) concentration in units of canine whole blood during storage and incubation at room temperature (approx 22 °C) to simulate temperature conditions during transfusion.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Walker Hounds.

PROCEDURES

A standard unit of blood (450 mL) was obtained from each dog twice, with at least 28 days between donations. Blood units collected from 4 dogs during the first donation underwent leukoreduction, whereas the blood units collected from the other 4 dogs did not undergo leukoreduction, prior to storage at 4 °C. The alternate treatment was applied to blood units collected during the second donation. A sample from each unit was obtained for determination of plasma NMH concentration the day of donation (before and after leukoreduction when applicable) and before and after incubation at room temperature for 5 hours on days 14 and 28 of storage.

RESULTS

Units that underwent leukoreduction had substantially lower leukocyte and platelet counts than nonleukoreduced units. Plasma NMH concentration increased immediately after leukoreduction but did not change significantly during the subsequent 28 days of storage, nor did it differ between units that did and did not undergo leukoreduction.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leukoreduction and simulated transfusion temperature did not affect the histamine load in units of canine whole blood during the first 28 days of storage. Further research is necessary to determine whether histamine contributes to the development and severity of blood transfusion reactions in dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of leukoreduction on N-methylhistamine (NMH; a stable histamine metabolite) concentration in units of canine whole blood during storage and incubation at room temperature (approx 22 °C) to simulate temperature conditions during transfusion.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Walker Hounds.

PROCEDURES

A standard unit of blood (450 mL) was obtained from each dog twice, with at least 28 days between donations. Blood units collected from 4 dogs during the first donation underwent leukoreduction, whereas the blood units collected from the other 4 dogs did not undergo leukoreduction, prior to storage at 4 °C. The alternate treatment was applied to blood units collected during the second donation. A sample from each unit was obtained for determination of plasma NMH concentration the day of donation (before and after leukoreduction when applicable) and before and after incubation at room temperature for 5 hours on days 14 and 28 of storage.

RESULTS

Units that underwent leukoreduction had substantially lower leukocyte and platelet counts than nonleukoreduced units. Plasma NMH concentration increased immediately after leukoreduction but did not change significantly during the subsequent 28 days of storage, nor did it differ between units that did and did not undergo leukoreduction.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leukoreduction and simulated transfusion temperature did not affect the histamine load in units of canine whole blood during the first 28 days of storage. Further research is necessary to determine whether histamine contributes to the development and severity of blood transfusion reactions in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Thomason (thomason@cvm.msstate.edu).