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Effect of suture caliber on the tensile strength of tenorrhaphies in cadaveric canine tendons

Daniel J. Duffy BVM&S (HONS), MS, VMD1, Chiara J. Curcillo VMD1, Yi-Jen Chang BVETMED, MS1, and George E. Moore DVM, PHD2
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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 2 2Department of Veterinary Administration, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of suture caliber on the tensile strength of tenorrhaphies performed with a locking-loop technique in cadaveric canine tendons

SAMPLE

60 superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) from 30 cadaveric adult dogs.

PROCEDURES

Transverse tenotomy was performed, and SDFTs were repaired with a locking-loop technique and polypropylene suture of 5 randomly assigned calibers: size-0, 2-0, 3-0, 4-0, or 5-0 (n = 12 SDFTs/suture caliber). Tendon constructs were tested to failure. Yield, peak, and failure forces and causes of failure were compared between groups.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD failure force for the constructs was significantly greater with large-caliber suture (size-0: 73.5 ± 3.1 N; size 2-0: 54.4 ± 7.1 N; size 3-0: 28.7 ± 4.9 N; size 4-0: 18.7 ± 3.4 N; and size 5-0: 8.8 ± 2.8 N). The likelihood of construct failure by suture pullout through the tendon substance increased with large-caliber suture (size-0: 12/12), whereas the likelihood of construct failure by suture breakage increased with small-caliber suture (2-0: 10/12; 3-0, 4-0, and 5-0: 12/12 each).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Large-caliber suture had greater tensile strength for tenorrhaphies performed with a locking-loop technique in cadaveric canine tendons. Prior to the use of large-caliber suture in patients requiring tenorrhaphy, however, in vivo studies are required to confirm the results obtained here.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of suture caliber on the tensile strength of tenorrhaphies performed with a locking-loop technique in cadaveric canine tendons

SAMPLE

60 superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) from 30 cadaveric adult dogs.

PROCEDURES

Transverse tenotomy was performed, and SDFTs were repaired with a locking-loop technique and polypropylene suture of 5 randomly assigned calibers: size-0, 2-0, 3-0, 4-0, or 5-0 (n = 12 SDFTs/suture caliber). Tendon constructs were tested to failure. Yield, peak, and failure forces and causes of failure were compared between groups.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD failure force for the constructs was significantly greater with large-caliber suture (size-0: 73.5 ± 3.1 N; size 2-0: 54.4 ± 7.1 N; size 3-0: 28.7 ± 4.9 N; size 4-0: 18.7 ± 3.4 N; and size 5-0: 8.8 ± 2.8 N). The likelihood of construct failure by suture pullout through the tendon substance increased with large-caliber suture (size-0: 12/12), whereas the likelihood of construct failure by suture breakage increased with small-caliber suture (2-0: 10/12; 3-0, 4-0, and 5-0: 12/12 each).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Large-caliber suture had greater tensile strength for tenorrhaphies performed with a locking-loop technique in cadaveric canine tendons. Prior to the use of large-caliber suture in patients requiring tenorrhaphy, however, in vivo studies are required to confirm the results obtained here.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Duffy (djduffy@ncsu.edu).