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Effects of topical ocular application of 1% trifluridine ophthalmic solution in dogs with experimentally induced recurrent ocular canine herpesvirus-1 infection

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 2 Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of topical ocular application of 1% trifluridine ophthalmic solution in dogs with experimentally induced recurrent ocular canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) infection.

ANIMALS 10 specific pathogen–free Beagles.

PROCEDURES 12 months prior to the beginning of the randomized, masked, placebo-controlled 30-day trial, latent ocular CHV-1 infection was experimentally induced in each dog by topical ocular inoculation of both eyes with a field strain of CHV-1. Recurrent ocular CHV-1 infection was induced by oral administration of prednisolone for 7 days (starting day 1). Starting on the fourth day of prednisolone administration, each dog received 1% trifluridine solution or artificial tears (placebo) topically in both eyes 6 times daily for 2 days and then 4 times daily for 12 days. Ophthalmic examinations were performed every 2 days, and ocular disease scores were calculated. Ocular samples for CHV-1 PCR assays and blood samples for clinicopathologic analyses and assessment of CHV-1 serum neutralization antibody titers were collected at predetermined intervals.

RESULTS Conjunctivitis was clinically detected in all dogs by day 4. Compared with dogs receiving placebo, mean and total clinical ocular disease scores were significantly lower and median CHV-1 shedding duration was significantly shorter for the trifluridine-treated dogs. Both groups had increasing CHV-1 serum neutralization antibody titers over time, but no significant differences between groups were detected. Clinicopathologic findings were unremarkable throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Topical ocular application of 1% trifluridine ophthalmic solution was well tolerated and effective at reducing disease scores and viral shedding duration in dogs with experimentally induced ocular CHV-1 infection, but may require frequent administration.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of topical ocular application of 1% trifluridine ophthalmic solution in dogs with experimentally induced recurrent ocular canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) infection.

ANIMALS 10 specific pathogen–free Beagles.

PROCEDURES 12 months prior to the beginning of the randomized, masked, placebo-controlled 30-day trial, latent ocular CHV-1 infection was experimentally induced in each dog by topical ocular inoculation of both eyes with a field strain of CHV-1. Recurrent ocular CHV-1 infection was induced by oral administration of prednisolone for 7 days (starting day 1). Starting on the fourth day of prednisolone administration, each dog received 1% trifluridine solution or artificial tears (placebo) topically in both eyes 6 times daily for 2 days and then 4 times daily for 12 days. Ophthalmic examinations were performed every 2 days, and ocular disease scores were calculated. Ocular samples for CHV-1 PCR assays and blood samples for clinicopathologic analyses and assessment of CHV-1 serum neutralization antibody titers were collected at predetermined intervals.

RESULTS Conjunctivitis was clinically detected in all dogs by day 4. Compared with dogs receiving placebo, mean and total clinical ocular disease scores were significantly lower and median CHV-1 shedding duration was significantly shorter for the trifluridine-treated dogs. Both groups had increasing CHV-1 serum neutralization antibody titers over time, but no significant differences between groups were detected. Clinicopathologic findings were unremarkable throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Topical ocular application of 1% trifluridine ophthalmic solution was well tolerated and effective at reducing disease scores and viral shedding duration in dogs with experimentally induced ocular CHV-1 infection, but may require frequent administration.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Ledbetter (ecl32@cornell.edu).