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Serum cholecystokinin concentrations in dogs with naturally acquired pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism

Sungjun Noh DVM, MS1, Hye-Sun Kim DVM, MS2, Jinhwa Chang DVM, PhD3, Ji-Houn Kang DVM, PhD4, Dongwoo Chang DVM, PhD5, and Mhan-Pyo Yang DVM, PhD6
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  • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 3 College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 4 College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 5 College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 6 College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine serum cholecystokinin (CCK) concentrations in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) and to evaluate associations among CCK concentration, PDH, and gallbladder mucocele (GBM).

ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs with PDH and 14 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were separated into 4 groups: healthy dogs without gallbladder sludge (group A; n = 7), healthy dogs with gallbladder sludge (group B; 7), dogs with PDH and gallbladder sludge (group C; 8), and dogs with PDH and GBM (group D; 6). Serum CCK concentrations were then measured before and 1, 2, and 4 hours after consumption of a high-fat meal. Concentrations in dogs with PDH were also measured before and after trilostane treatment. Results were compared among groups and assessment points.

RESULTS Preprandial serum CCK concentrations in group C were significantly lower than those in groups A, B, and D, but no significant differences in postprandial CCK concentrations were identified among the groups 1, 2, or 4 hours after the meal. With respect to trilostane treatment of dogs with PDH, no significant differences were identified between pre- and post-trilostane serum CCK concentrations in group C or D. Median CCK concentration after trilostane treatment was higher in group D than in group C, but this difference was not significant.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The outcomes in this study did not support the hypothesis that a low circulating CCK concentration affects the development of GBM in dogs with PDH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine serum cholecystokinin (CCK) concentrations in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) and to evaluate associations among CCK concentration, PDH, and gallbladder mucocele (GBM).

ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs with PDH and 14 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were separated into 4 groups: healthy dogs without gallbladder sludge (group A; n = 7), healthy dogs with gallbladder sludge (group B; 7), dogs with PDH and gallbladder sludge (group C; 8), and dogs with PDH and GBM (group D; 6). Serum CCK concentrations were then measured before and 1, 2, and 4 hours after consumption of a high-fat meal. Concentrations in dogs with PDH were also measured before and after trilostane treatment. Results were compared among groups and assessment points.

RESULTS Preprandial serum CCK concentrations in group C were significantly lower than those in groups A, B, and D, but no significant differences in postprandial CCK concentrations were identified among the groups 1, 2, or 4 hours after the meal. With respect to trilostane treatment of dogs with PDH, no significant differences were identified between pre- and post-trilostane serum CCK concentrations in group C or D. Median CCK concentration after trilostane treatment was higher in group D than in group C, but this difference was not significant.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The outcomes in this study did not support the hypothesis that a low circulating CCK concentration affects the development of GBM in dogs with PDH.

Contributor Notes

Drs. Noh and Kim contributed equally to the study.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kang (jhkang@chungbuk.ac.kr).