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Canine Brief Pain Inventory scores for dogs with osteoarthritis before and after administration of a monoclonal antibody against nerve growth factor

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  • 1 School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA 5371, Australia.
  • | 2 School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA 5371, Australia.
  • | 3 Nexvet Biopharma Pty Ltd, Level 39, 385 Bourke St, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia.

Abstract

Objective—To determine changes in Canine Brief Pain Inventory scores for dogs with osteoarthritis after administration of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against nerve growth factor (NGF) that was modified by use of a proprietary process for administration to dogs.

Animals—11 adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received the anti-NGF mAb (0.2 mg/kg, IV) at various evaluation times during the study period; at other evaluation times, dogs received an equivalent volume of PBS solution IV. Owners determined Canine Brief Pain Inventory pain severity (PS) and pain interference (PI) scores immediately before (baseline) and 2, 4, and 6 weeks after administration of the anti-NGF mAb; owners were unaware of the evaluation time at which the mAb had been administered.

Results—Compared with baseline PS scores (median, 4.75; range, 0.75 to 8.5), dogs had significantly lower PS scores 2 weeks (median, 3; range, 1 to 5.5) and 4 weeks (median, 2.25; range, 0.25 to 7.25) after administration of anti-NGF mAb. Compared with baseline PI scores (median, 5.33; range, 1.17 to 9.33), dogs had significantly lower PI scores 2 weeks (median, 3; range, 0.67 to 6.83) and 4 weeks (median, 3.33; range, 0.67 to 6.67) after administration of anti-NGF mAb. The PS and PI scores 6 weeks after mAb administration were lower than baseline scores, although values were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested the evaluated anti-NGF mAb decreased PS and PI scores for 4 weeks after administration. This treatment may be effective for alleviation of signs of pain in dogs with osteoarthritis for up to 4 weeks.

Abstract

Objective—To determine changes in Canine Brief Pain Inventory scores for dogs with osteoarthritis after administration of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against nerve growth factor (NGF) that was modified by use of a proprietary process for administration to dogs.

Animals—11 adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received the anti-NGF mAb (0.2 mg/kg, IV) at various evaluation times during the study period; at other evaluation times, dogs received an equivalent volume of PBS solution IV. Owners determined Canine Brief Pain Inventory pain severity (PS) and pain interference (PI) scores immediately before (baseline) and 2, 4, and 6 weeks after administration of the anti-NGF mAb; owners were unaware of the evaluation time at which the mAb had been administered.

Results—Compared with baseline PS scores (median, 4.75; range, 0.75 to 8.5), dogs had significantly lower PS scores 2 weeks (median, 3; range, 1 to 5.5) and 4 weeks (median, 2.25; range, 0.25 to 7.25) after administration of anti-NGF mAb. Compared with baseline PI scores (median, 5.33; range, 1.17 to 9.33), dogs had significantly lower PI scores 2 weeks (median, 3; range, 0.67 to 6.83) and 4 weeks (median, 3.33; range, 0.67 to 6.67) after administration of anti-NGF mAb. The PS and PI scores 6 weeks after mAb administration were lower than baseline scores, although values were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested the evaluated anti-NGF mAb decreased PS and PI scores for 4 weeks after administration. This treatment may be effective for alleviation of signs of pain in dogs with osteoarthritis for up to 4 weeks.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Webster's present address is Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.

Dr. Anderson's present address is School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU1 2EP, England.

This study was funded by Nexvet Biopharma Pty Ltd.

Dr. Webster is a paid consultant for Nexvet Biopharma Pty Ltd. Dr. Anderson declares no competing financial interest. Dr. Gearing is the Chief Scientific Officer at Nexvet Biopharma Pty Ltd.

The authors thank Dr. John Punke for advice regarding study design and assistance with ethics committee approval, Leanne Branford and Elise Baker for help with data collection, and Drs. Alec Drew and Elena Virtue for conducting assays of monoclonal antibody preparations.

Address correspondence to Dr. Webster (ralph.p.webster@gmail.com).