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Effect of hematocrit on accuracy of two point-of-care glucometers for use in dogs

Amanda E. H. Paul BVSc, MVetSt1, Robert E. Shiel MVB2, Florence Juvet DVM3, Carmel T. Mooney MVB, MPhil, PhD4, and Caroline S. Mansfield BVMS, MVM5
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6155, Australia
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Studies, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
  • | 3 Southern Counties Veterinary Specialists, Unit 6, Forest Corner Farm, Hangersley, Ringwood, Hampshire BH24 3JW, England.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Studies, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6155, Australia

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of Hct on blood glucose readings of dogs obtained by use of 2 point-of-care (POC) blood glucometers and a laboratory analyzer.

Animals—184 dogs, including 139 Greyhounds.

Procedures—Venous blood samples collected from 184 dogs with a range of Hcts (measured in EDTA-anticoagulated blood) were immediately analyzed with a handheld glucometer specifically developed for veterinary use and a glucometer developed for use in humans. The remainder of each blood sample was placed in fluoride oxalate tubes, and plasma glucose concentration was measured with a laboratory analyzer. Agreement between results for the POC glucometers and laboratory analyzer and effect of Hct on glucometer accuracy was assessed via regression analysis.

Results—Significant differences were detected between results of the glucometers and the reference laboratory analyzer. The Hct affected the correlation between results for the glucometers and the laboratory analyzer. Deviations of the glucometers from the reference interval varied with Hct. The glucometer for veterinary use more closely correlated with the glucose concentration when Hct was within or above its reference interval. The glucometer for use in humans more closely approximated laboratory reference glucose concentrations in anemic dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hct had a relevant impact on the correlation between whole blood and plasma glucose concentrations in dogs. Significant variations between results obtained with the 2 glucometers could be critical when interpreting blood glucose measurements or selecting a POC glucometer for an intensive care setting and precise glycemic control in critically ill dogs.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of Hct on blood glucose readings of dogs obtained by use of 2 point-of-care (POC) blood glucometers and a laboratory analyzer.

Animals—184 dogs, including 139 Greyhounds.

Procedures—Venous blood samples collected from 184 dogs with a range of Hcts (measured in EDTA-anticoagulated blood) were immediately analyzed with a handheld glucometer specifically developed for veterinary use and a glucometer developed for use in humans. The remainder of each blood sample was placed in fluoride oxalate tubes, and plasma glucose concentration was measured with a laboratory analyzer. Agreement between results for the POC glucometers and laboratory analyzer and effect of Hct on glucometer accuracy was assessed via regression analysis.

Results—Significant differences were detected between results of the glucometers and the reference laboratory analyzer. The Hct affected the correlation between results for the glucometers and the laboratory analyzer. Deviations of the glucometers from the reference interval varied with Hct. The glucometer for veterinary use more closely correlated with the glucose concentration when Hct was within or above its reference interval. The glucometer for use in humans more closely approximated laboratory reference glucose concentrations in anemic dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hct had a relevant impact on the correlation between whole blood and plasma glucose concentrations in dogs. Significant variations between results obtained with the 2 glucometers could be critical when interpreting blood glucose measurements or selecting a POC glucometer for an intensive care setting and precise glycemic control in critically ill dogs.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Mansfield's present address is Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Hwy, Werribee, VIC 3030, Australia.

Dr. Shiel's present address is Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6155, Australia.

The authors thank Dr. Patrick Brogan for assistance with the statistical analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Paul (a.paul@murdoch.edu.au).