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Evaluation of inflammatory responses induced via intra-articular injection of interleukin-1 in horses receiving a dietary nutraceutical and assessment of the clinical effects of long-term nutraceutical administration

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  • 1 Department of Plant Agriculture, Ontario Agriculture College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 3 Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, College of Biological Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate inflammatory responses induced via intra-articular recombinant human interleukin (IL)-1β treatment in horses receiving a dietary nutraceutical (DN; composed of mussel, shark cartilage, abalone, and Biota orientalis lipid extract) and assess the clinical effects of long-term DN administration.

Animals—22 healthy horses.

Procedures—12 horses were fed 0, 15, 45, or 75 mg of DN (3 horses/treatment) daily for 84 days. General health and clinicopathologic variables were monitored at intervals. Ten other horses received 0 or 15 g of DN/d (5 horses/treatment) for 29 days (beginning day −14). One intercarpal joint in each horse was injected twice with IL-1β (10 and 100 ng on days 0 and 1, respectively), and the contralateral joint was similarly injected with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Synovial fluid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), nitric oxide (NO), and protein concentrations and leukocyte counts were analyzed before and at intervals after injections.

Results—Administration of the DN (up to 75 g/d) to horses for 84 days did not induce any adverse effects. In the other experiment, synovial fluid PGE2, GAG, and protein concentrations and leukocyte count increased after intra-articular injections of IL-1β (compared with effects of saline solution injections) in horses that received no DN; NO concentration was not affected. In horses that were fed the DN, intra-articular IL-1β injections did not induce significant increases in synovial fluid PGE2 and GAG concentrations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that administration of the DN may be useful in preventing inflammation associated with arthritis and degenerative joint disease in horses.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate inflammatory responses induced via intra-articular recombinant human interleukin (IL)-1β treatment in horses receiving a dietary nutraceutical (DN; composed of mussel, shark cartilage, abalone, and Biota orientalis lipid extract) and assess the clinical effects of long-term DN administration.

Animals—22 healthy horses.

Procedures—12 horses were fed 0, 15, 45, or 75 mg of DN (3 horses/treatment) daily for 84 days. General health and clinicopathologic variables were monitored at intervals. Ten other horses received 0 or 15 g of DN/d (5 horses/treatment) for 29 days (beginning day −14). One intercarpal joint in each horse was injected twice with IL-1β (10 and 100 ng on days 0 and 1, respectively), and the contralateral joint was similarly injected with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Synovial fluid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), nitric oxide (NO), and protein concentrations and leukocyte counts were analyzed before and at intervals after injections.

Results—Administration of the DN (up to 75 g/d) to horses for 84 days did not induce any adverse effects. In the other experiment, synovial fluid PGE2, GAG, and protein concentrations and leukocyte count increased after intra-articular injections of IL-1β (compared with effects of saline solution injections) in horses that received no DN; NO concentration was not affected. In horses that were fed the DN, intra-articular IL-1β injections did not induce significant increases in synovial fluid PGE2 and GAG concentrations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that administration of the DN may be useful in preventing inflammation associated with arthritis and degenerative joint disease in horses.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Interpath Pty Ltd, Australia, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

Dr. Pearson was supported by a scholarship from NSERC.

The study sponsor did not participate in the study design; collection, analysis, or interpretation of data; writing of the manuscript; or the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

The authors thank Drs. Dan Kenney and Antonio Cruz for technical assistance regarding arthrocentesis procedures.

Address correspondence to Dr. Pearson.