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Role of the MAPKERK pathway in regulation of cytokine expression by Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis–exposed bovine monocytes

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPKERK) pathway in the interaction between Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms and bovine monocytes.

Sample Population—Monocytes obtained from healthy adult Holstein dairy cows that were not infected with MAP organisms.

Procedures—Monocytes and MAP organisms were incubated together with or without a specific inhibitor of the MAPKERK pathway (PD98059), and the capacity of monocytes to express tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10 and -12, produce nitric oxide, acidify phagosomes, kill MAP organisms, and undergo apoptosis was evaluated.

Results—The MAPKERK pathway was activated within 10 minutes after addition of MAP organisms to monocytes. Addition of PD98059 to monocyte-MAP mixtures decreased monocyte TNF-α and IL-12 mRNA expression but had no effect on IL-10 mRNA expression. Treatment with PD98059 failed to induce significant alterations in phagosome acidification, organism killing, nitric oxide production, or apoptosis of MAP-exposed monocytes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the MAPKERK pathway was activated during the interaction of MAP organisms with monocytes, which initiated TNF-α and IL-12 mRNA expression but failed to initiate antimicrobial activity. The MAPKERK pathway may be involved in initiating proinflammatory and proimmune responses in MAP infection in cattle.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPKERK) pathway in the interaction between Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms and bovine monocytes.

Sample Population—Monocytes obtained from healthy adult Holstein dairy cows that were not infected with MAP organisms.

Procedures—Monocytes and MAP organisms were incubated together with or without a specific inhibitor of the MAPKERK pathway (PD98059), and the capacity of monocytes to express tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10 and -12, produce nitric oxide, acidify phagosomes, kill MAP organisms, and undergo apoptosis was evaluated.

Results—The MAPKERK pathway was activated within 10 minutes after addition of MAP organisms to monocytes. Addition of PD98059 to monocyte-MAP mixtures decreased monocyte TNF-α and IL-12 mRNA expression but had no effect on IL-10 mRNA expression. Treatment with PD98059 failed to induce significant alterations in phagosome acidification, organism killing, nitric oxide production, or apoptosis of MAP-exposed monocytes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the MAPKERK pathway was activated during the interaction of MAP organisms with monocytes, which initiated TNF-α and IL-12 mRNA expression but failed to initiate antimicrobial activity. The MAPKERK pathway may be involved in initiating proinflammatory and proimmune responses in MAP infection in cattle.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by a grant from the USDA-NRI-04-010447. Dr. Souza was supported by a Research Fellowship from Coordenacao de Aperfeicoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, CAPES/Brazil.

Address correspondence to Dr. Weiss.