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Effects of intravenous administration of lactated Ringer's solution on hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal measurements in healthy isoflurane-anesthetized dogs

William W. Muir IIIQTest Laboratories, 6456 Fiesta Dr, Columbus, OH 43235.

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Yukie UeyamaQTest Laboratories, 6456 Fiesta Dr, Columbus, OH 43235.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal effects of IV administration of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) to healthy anesthetized dogs.

Design—4-period, 4-treatment cross-over study.

Animals—8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, instrumented, and randomly assigned to receive LRS (0, 10, 20, or 30 mL/kg/h [0, 4.5, 9.1, or 13.6 mL/lb/h]), IV, on 4 occasions separated by at least 7 days. Blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein, albumin, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations; PCV; colloid osmotic pressure; arterial and venous pH and blood gases (Po2; Pco2); whole blood and plasma viscosity; arterial and venous blood pressures; cardiac output; results of urinalysis; urine production; glomerular filtration rate; and anesthetic recovery times were monitored. Oxygen delivery, vascular resistance, stroke volume, pulse pressure, and blood and plasma volume were calculated.

Results—Increasing rates of LRS administration resulted in dose-dependent decreases in PCV; blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein and albumin concentrations; colloid osmotic pressure; and whole blood viscosity. Plasma viscosity; serum electrolyte concentrations; data from arterial and venous blood gas analysis; glomerular filtration rate; urine production; heart rate; pulse, central venous, and arterial blood pressures; pulmonary vascular resistance; and oxygen delivery did not change. Pulmonary artery pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output increased, and systemic vascular resistance decreased.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Conventional IV infusion rates of LRS to isoflurane-anesthetized dogs decreased colligative blood components; increased plasma volume, pulmonary artery pressure, and cardiac output; and did not change urine production or oxygen delivery to tissues.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal effects of IV administration of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) to healthy anesthetized dogs.

Design—4-period, 4-treatment cross-over study.

Animals—8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, instrumented, and randomly assigned to receive LRS (0, 10, 20, or 30 mL/kg/h [0, 4.5, 9.1, or 13.6 mL/lb/h]), IV, on 4 occasions separated by at least 7 days. Blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein, albumin, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations; PCV; colloid osmotic pressure; arterial and venous pH and blood gases (Po2; Pco2); whole blood and plasma viscosity; arterial and venous blood pressures; cardiac output; results of urinalysis; urine production; glomerular filtration rate; and anesthetic recovery times were monitored. Oxygen delivery, vascular resistance, stroke volume, pulse pressure, and blood and plasma volume were calculated.

Results—Increasing rates of LRS administration resulted in dose-dependent decreases in PCV; blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein and albumin concentrations; colloid osmotic pressure; and whole blood viscosity. Plasma viscosity; serum electrolyte concentrations; data from arterial and venous blood gas analysis; glomerular filtration rate; urine production; heart rate; pulse, central venous, and arterial blood pressures; pulmonary vascular resistance; and oxygen delivery did not change. Pulmonary artery pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output increased, and systemic vascular resistance decreased.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Conventional IV infusion rates of LRS to isoflurane-anesthetized dogs decreased colligative blood components; increased plasma volume, pulmonary artery pressure, and cardiac output; and did not change urine production or oxygen delivery to tissues.

Contributor Notes

Supported by a grant from Abbott Animal Health.

The authors thank Drs. Timothy E. Hodge, Adriana Pedraza-Toscano, Pedro Vargas-Pinto, and Yaowalak Panyasing for technical support.

Address correspondence to Dr. Muir (bill.muir@amcny.org).