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Pathology in Practice

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  • 1 Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA
  • | 2 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • | 4 Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
History

A 3-year-old 65-kg Nubian doe had a 2-week history of lethargy and weakness that progressed to recumbency. The doe did not improve with treatment of penicillin (20,000 to 40,000 U/kg/d, IM) and meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg, SC, q 36 h) at the onset of the clinical signs. Two weeks before the clinical presentation, the doe had dystocia associated with stillbirth of twins and received fenbendazole (10 mg/kg, PO) just prior to the delivery.

Clinical and Gross Findings

On physical examination, the doe had white oral and ocular mucous membranes and continuous cough and wheezes on thoracic auscultation. The abdomen was

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Watanabe (tnegrao@ncsu.edu)

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists