Toward the world’s leading educational institution in veterinary medicine

Yongbaek Kim College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea

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Seung Joon Baek College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea

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Inhyung Lee College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea

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So Yeong Lee College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea

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Ho Jae Han College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea

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Established in 1947, the Seoul National University College of Veterinary Medicine (SNU CVM) strives to promote the health and welfare of animals and humans for a sustainable future through education, research, and public service. SNU CVM has been working continuously to meet the global standards. As a result, it became the first and only educational institution in Asia accredited by the AVMA Council on Education in 2019 and ranked 38th in 2020 in the QS World University Evaluation. To make the vision of the world’s leading educational institution in veterinary medicine a reality, SNU CVM set up 3 goals: nurturing veterinarians to become future leaders, contribution through advanced care, and securing research excellence. Below are recent developments in SNU CVM.

Renovated student-centered curriculum with integrated wet-lab sessions

After analysis and planning, SNU CVM established a student-centered curriculum. The new curriculum features enhancing the outcome of wet-lab sessions through removal of overlapping topics and increasing the number of elective courses to accommodate students’ requests and societal needs in the future of veterinary medicine. The renovation of the DVM curriculum was with the support of the Edu-Inno 2031 Project grant given by SNU. From the first semester of 2022, the integrated laboratory practice curriculum of SNU CVM has started. As the integrated laboratory practice began, the implementation standards and operating guidelines for the integrated training were prepared. The first-year DVM students are taking integrated practice for basic biomedical science in 2022. In 2023 and 2024, the students will take integrated practice for veterinary preventive medicine and integrated practice for veterinary clinical sciences, respectively.

From 2023, to enhance the students’ competency in the field of large animals, the rotation period is increased from 1 week to 2 weeks. In addition, the clinical rotation in theriogenology will be increased from 1 week to 2 weeks to strengthen basic surgical skills including ovariohysterectomy. Instead, the self-learning period in the fourth-year DVM program will be reduced from 6 weeks to 4 weeks n addition, students can manage their learning experiences through e-Portfolio® in SNU CVM, actively establish learning plans and explore their career..

Reformed graduation exam with addition of clinical skills using Smart Simulation Lab

To enhance clinical skills of DVM students, SNU CVM established a simulation lab in July 2021. This laboratory has 12 stations of clinical skills and is equipped with dummy models and equipment for practicing IV, IM, and SC injections, surgical instruments, suture and tie, intubation, thoracocentesis, CPR, auscultation, extremity bandage, body bandage, endoscopy, and ultrasonography. At each station, students can practice the clinical skills after watching practice videos. Since live animals are not used, students can practice their medical techniques repeatedly and intensively. SNU CVM offers an elective course for the students’ participation and plans to utilize this facility to evaluate clinical skills as a part of graduation exam from December 2022, in addition to the written test. The clinical skills test will be implemented through the Objective Structured Clinical/Practical Examination. A specific skill or set of skills required by the 12 stations will be objectively scored according to the established evaluation rubrics.

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The utilization of the Smart Simulation Lab can improve animal welfare while allowing students to experience repeated clinical practice

Citation: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 261, 2; 10.2460/javma.22.12.0559

Introduction of linear accelerator for radiation therapy

Radiation therapy can be used as a stand-alone therapy or in conjunction with other therapies such as surgery and chemotherapy. An addition to the SNU Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital equipped the facility to provide radiation therapy for companion animals and research in April 2022 at the SNU CVM. Construction wrapped up in late October 2022, followed by staff training and a commissioning process for a new model of linear accelerator that was introduced to the Department of Veterinary Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology. The SNU CVM facility features advanced technology, volumetric modulated arc therapy by combining intensity-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy that allows the delivery of more tightly focused treatments to cancer in a significantly shorter time. SNU CVM hired a radiation specialist to help guide the linear accelerator. This facility will serve for the veterinary oncology patients referred by local practitioners as well as biomedical researchers.

SNU CVM aims to become a world-leading veterinary college that contributes to societal advancement through continued renovation of curricula, upgrading educational and research infrastructures, promoting joint translational research, and improvement of the veterinary teaching hospital. Furthermore, SNU CVM will continue to foster students who can lead the effort to surmount the challenges to animal and human health and well-being.

  • The utilization of the Smart Simulation Lab can improve animal welfare while allowing students to experience repeated clinical practice

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