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Multi-institutional study of long-term outcomes of a ventral versus lateral approach for mandibular and sublingual sialoadenectomy in dogs with a unilateral sialocele: 46 cases (1999–2019)

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
  • | 2 Veterinary Emergency Clinic and Referral Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the long-term outcomes of a ventral versus lateral surgical approach for mandibular and sublingual sialoadenectomy in dogs with a unilateral sialocele.

ANIMALS

46 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs that underwent unilateral sialoadenectomy between 1999 and 2019 were retrospectively reviewed, and information was collected regarding signalment, clinical signs, historical treatment, swelling location, diagnostic imaging findings, sialoadenectomy approach, adjunctive treatments, intraoperative complications, hospitalization time, postoperative complications, recurrence, and contralateral sialocele development.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences in incidences of intraoperative complications, recurrence, or postoperative complications between dogs in which a lateral versus ventral approach was used. Clinically important intraoperative complications included iatrogenic tears in the oral mucosa, ligature slippage from the duct end, hemorrhage, and possible lingual nerve transection. Surgical experience was associated with the likelihood that intraoperative complications would develop. Suspected recurrence was reported in 2 of 26 (8%) dogs that underwent a lateral approach and 2 of 12 (17%) dogs that underwent a ventral approach. Hospitalization time was significantly shorter with the lateral approach than with the ventral approach. Postoperative complications had a short-term onset and occurred in 4 of 25 (16%) dogs that underwent a lateral approach and 3 of 12 (25%) dogs that underwent a ventral approach. Age and presence of a pharyngeal sialocele were associated with development of postoperative complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Long-term outcomes for ventral and lateral approaches to sialoadenectomy were favorable and appeared to be comparable. Further prospective study into potential associations of sialoadenectomy approach, age, and pharyngeal sialoceles on outcome is needed.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the long-term outcomes of a ventral versus lateral surgical approach for mandibular and sublingual sialoadenectomy in dogs with a unilateral sialocele.

ANIMALS

46 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs that underwent unilateral sialoadenectomy between 1999 and 2019 were retrospectively reviewed, and information was collected regarding signalment, clinical signs, historical treatment, swelling location, diagnostic imaging findings, sialoadenectomy approach, adjunctive treatments, intraoperative complications, hospitalization time, postoperative complications, recurrence, and contralateral sialocele development.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences in incidences of intraoperative complications, recurrence, or postoperative complications between dogs in which a lateral versus ventral approach was used. Clinically important intraoperative complications included iatrogenic tears in the oral mucosa, ligature slippage from the duct end, hemorrhage, and possible lingual nerve transection. Surgical experience was associated with the likelihood that intraoperative complications would develop. Suspected recurrence was reported in 2 of 26 (8%) dogs that underwent a lateral approach and 2 of 12 (17%) dogs that underwent a ventral approach. Hospitalization time was significantly shorter with the lateral approach than with the ventral approach. Postoperative complications had a short-term onset and occurred in 4 of 25 (16%) dogs that underwent a lateral approach and 3 of 12 (25%) dogs that underwent a ventral approach. Age and presence of a pharyngeal sialocele were associated with development of postoperative complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Long-term outcomes for ventral and lateral approaches to sialoadenectomy were favorable and appeared to be comparable. Further prospective study into potential associations of sialoadenectomy approach, age, and pharyngeal sialoceles on outcome is needed.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Oblak (moblak@uoguelph.ca)