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  • 1 From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
Introduction

A 10-year-old 10.3-kg spayed female American Eskimo Dog was evaluated because of pharyngeal dysphagia, increased salivation, and regurgitation. Two weeks earlier, the owner noted the dog had difficulty during swallowing and was drooling. The dog then began regurgitating, especially after drinking; the frequency of regurgitation increased to 10 times within the preceding 24 hours.

Physical examination of the dog revealed pseudo-ptyalism, and regurgitation of white foamy liquid was observed. There were no other abnormal findings except a grade 1/6 apical systolic heart murmur. On neurologic examination, the gag reflex was absent. The retractor bulbi (corneal) reflex, menace response, and

Introduction

A 10-year-old 10.3-kg spayed female American Eskimo Dog was evaluated because of pharyngeal dysphagia, increased salivation, and regurgitation. Two weeks earlier, the owner noted the dog had difficulty during swallowing and was drooling. The dog then began regurgitating, especially after drinking; the frequency of regurgitation increased to 10 times within the preceding 24 hours.

Physical examination of the dog revealed pseudo-ptyalism, and regurgitation of white foamy liquid was observed. There were no other abnormal findings except a grade 1/6 apical systolic heart murmur. On neurologic examination, the gag reflex was absent. The retractor bulbi (corneal) reflex, menace response, and

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Bentley (rbentley@purdue.edu).