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What Is Your Neurologic Diagnosis?

Alison Little DVM1, Alicia Olivier DVM, PhD2, Alison M. Lee DVM, MS1, and Talisha Moore DVM1
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  • 1 Departments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.
  • | 2 Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

A 12-year-old 5.4-kg (11.88-lb) spayed female Miniature Dachshund was referred for evaluation of a left head tilt and vestibular ataxia. The dog had become progressively ataxic over the preceding 3 days. Initially, the dog was presented to the primary veterinarian, who performed a CBC and serum biochemical panel; there were no important hematologic findings, and moderately high alanine transaminase activity (237 U/L; reference range, 10 to 125 U/L) and mild hyperglobulinemia (4.6 g/dL; reference range, 2.5 to 4.5 g/dL) were identified. The dog was given maropitant citrate (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], SC, once) just prior to referral. At the referral

Contributor Notes

Dr. Little's present address is Toronto Animal Health Partners, North York, ON M3B 2R2, Canada.

Dr. Moore's present address is the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Address correspondence to Dr. Moore (tmoore73@utk.edu).