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Update on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of atopic dermatitis in dogs

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  • 1 1Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Colleges of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, England.
  • | 2 2Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.
  • | 3 3Veterinary Professional Services, Zoetis Inc, 10 Sylvan Way, Parsippany, NJ 07054.
  • | 4 4Global Therapeutics Research, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49007.

Abstract

Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in dogs has led to more effective treatment plans, including skin barrier repair and new targeted treatments for management of allergy-associated itch and inflammation. The intent of this review article is to provide an update on the etiologic rationale behind current recommendations that emphasize a multimodal approach for the management of atopic dermatitis in dogs. Increasing knowledge of this complex disease process will help direct future treatment options.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Fadok (valerie.fadok@zoetis.com).