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  • 3. Gambino JM, Sivacolundhu R, DeLucia M, et al. Repair of a sliding (type I) hiatal hernia in a cat via herniorrhaphy, esophagoplasty and floppy Nissen fundoplication. JFMS Open Rep 2015;1:2055116915602498.

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.
  • | 2 Sierra Veterinary Specialists, 555 Morrill Ave, Reno, NV 89512.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.
History

A 1.5-year-old 4.38-kg (9.6-lb) neutered male domestic shorthair cat was referred because of a 3-day history of retching, ptyalism, and inappetence. Clinical signs were refractory to medical management (ie, administration of maropitant citrate, famotidine, and crystalloid fluid at unknown dosages).

At the time of hospital admission, the cat was alert, responsive, and euhydrated with a body condition score of 5/9. The cat had a body temperature of 38.7°C (101.6°F). The heart rate (170 beats/min; reference range, 120 to 140 beats/min) and respiratory rate (60 breaths/min; reference range, 16 to 40 breaths/min) were mildly high, likely attributable to stress or

Contributor Notes

Dr. Gambino's present address is Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

Address correspondence to Dr. Gambino (Gambino@cvm.msstate.edu).