• View in gallery

    Photographs illustrating placement of a green linear tattoo to identify a cat (A) and a male dog (B) that have been neutered. For male and female cats and female dogs, the tattoo should be applied to the ventral aspect of the abdomen on or immediately lateral to the ventral midline incision or where a ventral midline spay incision would typically be placed. For male dogs, the tattoo should be applied on the prescrotal incision or immediately lateral to the prepuce.

  • View in gallery

    Photographs illustrating unilateral ear tipping to indicate that a community cat has been neutered (A) and showing a community cat with an injured ear flap (B). Ear tipping, rather than notching, is recommended to identify neutered community cats, because ear tipping results in a distinctive straight edge whereas ear flap injuries may easily be mistaken for surgical ear notching.

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