• 1. Tauk BS, Drobatz KJ, Wallace KA, et al. Correlation between glucose concentrations in serum, plasma, and whole blood measured by a point-of-care glucometer and serum glucose concentration measured by an automated biochemical analyzer for canine and feline blood samples. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015; 246: 13271333.

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  • 2. Higgins PJ, Garlick RL, Bunn HF. Glycosylated hemoglobin in human and animal red cells. Role of glucose permeability. Diabetes 1982; 31: 743748.

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  • 3. Tonyushkina K, Nichols JH. Glucose meters: a review of technical challenges to obtaining accurate results. J Diabetes Sci Technol 2009; 3: 971980.

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  • 4. Lane SL, Koenig A, Brainard BM. Formulation and validation of a predictive model to correct blood glucose concentrations obtained with a veterinary point-of-care glucometer in hemodiluted and hemoconcentrated canine blood samples. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015; 246: 307312.

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  • 5. Cohen TA, Nelson RW, Kass PH, et al. Evaluation of six portable blood glucose meters for measuring blood glucose concentration in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2009; 235: 276280.

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  • 6. Zini E, Moretti S, Tschuor F, et al. Evaluation of a new portable glucose meter designed for the use in cats. Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd 2009; 151: 448451.

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  • 1. Cohen TA, Nelson RW, Kass PH, et al. Evaluation of six portable blood glucose meters for measuring blood glucose concentration in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2009; 235: 276280.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Zini E, Moretti S, Tschuor F, et al. Evaluation of a new portable glucose meter designed for the use in cats. Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd 2009; 151: 448451.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

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Letters to the Editor

Human versus veterinary POC glucometers

Accuracy of point-of-care (POC) glucometers is a topic of great concern in both human and veterinary medicine, and I would like to thank Tauk et al1 for their recent study investigating the accuracy of POC glucometers when used to analyze canine and feline blood samples. I was surprised to see that a human POC glucometer was used in this study, given that there are species-specific variations in glucose distribution between the cellular and plasma portions of blood.2 For instance, compared with humans, dogs and cats have a significantly greater percentage of