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What Is Your Neurologic Diagnosis?

Andrew C. Durden1, Marc Kent DVM, DACVIM2, and Simon R. Platt BVM&S, DACVIM3
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

An 11-year-old 32-kg (70.4-lb) spayed female Labrador Retriever was evaluated at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine because of exophthalmos and epiphora of the right eye. Additionally, the owners perceived that the right eye was painful because the dog would squint that eye when the area of the head near the eye was touched. Physical examination findings were considered normal with the exception of exophthalmos, decreased retropulsion, and slight protrusion of the third eyelid of the right eye. Signs of pain were elicited when transpalpebral pressure was applied to the right eye. Examination of the left eye revealed

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kent (Mkent1@uga.edu).