• 1.

    Anderson FL, Sutton RB, Tsagaris TJ, et al. Spontaneous pulmonary hypertension in the bovine. Am J Physiol 1972;222:561564.

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What Is Your Diagnosis?

John R. Middleton DVM, PhD, DACVIM1, Deborah M. Fine DVM, MS, DACVIM2, Lisa G. Britt DVM, MS, DACVR3, Dusty W. Nagy DVM, PhD, DACVIM4, and Corey R. Wall DVM5
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
History

A 2-day-old 44-kg (97-lb) purebred female Holstein calf was evaluated for weakness, signs of depression, and inability to stand unsupported. Immediately after birth, the calf could stand and was tube fed with approximately 4 L of colostrum. Twenty-four hours after birth, the calf was standing and suckled its daily requirement of milk replacer, but 48 hours after birth, the calf was recumbent and only drank half of its 2-L morning milk replacer feeding. The owner had treated the calf with 100 mg of tulathromycin that morning. On initial examination, rectal temperature (39°C [101.5°F]) and heart rate (120 beats/min) were

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Middleton.