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Evaluation of four point-of-care meters for rapid determination of blood lactate concentrations in dogs

Mark J. Acierno DVM, DACVIM1 and Mark A. Mitchell DVM, PhD2
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70810.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70810.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether blood lactate values determined in dogs with 4 commercially available point-of-care meters were in agreement with values determined with a critical care laboratory blood analyzer.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—50 dogs evaluated for emergency treatment.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected at initial evaluation and processed on 4 point-of-care meters and on a critical care laboratory blood analyzer.

Results—All 4 point-of-care lactate meters generated measurements that were in agreement with the hospital's critical care analyzer. Values for agreement (bias) between the 4 point-of-care meters and the critical care analyzer were −0.652 (limits of agreement [LA], −1.958 to 0.654]), −0.670 (LA, −2.110 to 0.769), −0.096 (LA, −2.071 to 1.879), and −0.498 (LA, −2.616 to 1.620), respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Despite its prognostic and therapeutic relevance, blood lactate measurement in dogs has been hampered by the inability to perform the test in a timely fashion. Results of the present study indicated that several handheld point-of-care lactate meters provided results that were in agreement with a laboratory critical care blood analyzer.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether blood lactate values determined in dogs with 4 commercially available point-of-care meters were in agreement with values determined with a critical care laboratory blood analyzer.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—50 dogs evaluated for emergency treatment.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected at initial evaluation and processed on 4 point-of-care meters and on a critical care laboratory blood analyzer.

Results—All 4 point-of-care lactate meters generated measurements that were in agreement with the hospital's critical care analyzer. Values for agreement (bias) between the 4 point-of-care meters and the critical care analyzer were −0.652 (limits of agreement [LA], −1.958 to 0.654]), −0.670 (LA, −2.110 to 0.769), −0.096 (LA, −2.071 to 1.879), and −0.498 (LA, −2.616 to 1.620), respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Despite its prognostic and therapeutic relevance, blood lactate measurement in dogs has been hampered by the inability to perform the test in a timely fashion. Results of the present study indicated that several handheld point-of-care lactate meters provided results that were in agreement with a laboratory critical care blood analyzer.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Acierno.