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Toggle rod stabilization for treatment of hip joint luxation in dogs: 62 cases (2000–2005)

Jennifer L. Demko DVM1, Brian K. Sidaway DVM, MS, DACVS2, Kelley M. Thieman DVM3, Derek B. Fox DVM, PhD, DACVS4, Carolyn R. Boyle PhD5, and Ron M. McLaughlin DVM, DVSc, DACVS6
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762-6100
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762-6100
  • | 3 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
  • | 4 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
  • | 5 Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762-6100
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762-6100

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of open toggle rod stabilization in dogs with luxation of the hip joint.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—62 dogs.

Procedures—Information on signalment, surgical procedure, and postoperative care was obtained from the medical records. A questionnaire was sent to all owners to solicit follow-up information.

Results—The distribution for time between luxation and surgery was bimodal, with 24 (39%) dogs examined ≤ 2 days after injury and 23 (37%) examined > 7 days after injury. Postoperative complications developed in 16 of the 62 (26%) dogs, with complications developing within 1 week after surgery in 10 of the 16. The most common complication was reluxation, which occurred in 7 dogs. Dogs in which surgery time was < 2 hours were significantly less likely to have a reluxation (2/40 [5%]) than were dogs in which surgery time was ≥ 2 hours (5/22 [23%]). When asked to rate current limb function (0 = no lameness and 5 = non–weightbearing lame) a minimum of 6 months after surgery, 23 of 27 (85%) owners indicated a score of 0 or 1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of the present study suggest that toggle rod stabilization is an effective treatment for hip joint luxation in dogs. However, complications, particularly reluxation, were common.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. Carla Huston for assisting in the design of the client questionnaire.

Address correspondence to Dr. Demko