Use of a particulate extracellular matrix bioscaffold for treatment of acquired urinary incontinence in dogs

Jeffrey D. Wood Northside Veterinary Hospital, 1091 W Moore Rd, Hillsdale, MI 49242.

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Abby Simmons-Byrd ACell Inc, 2700 Kent Ave, West Lafayette, IN 47906.

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Alan R. Spievack ACell Inc, 2700 Kent Ave, West Lafayette, IN 47906.

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Stephen F. Badylak The McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219.

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 DVM, PhD, MD

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of a particulate bioscaffold consisting of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the urinary bladder from pigs for treatment of acquired urinary incontinence in dogs resistant to medical treatment.

Design—Case series.

Animals—9 female dogs with acquired urinary incontinence.

Procedure—In 6 dogs, 30 mg of particulate ECM in 1.0 mL of a carrier consisting of glycerin and saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was injected into each of 3 equally spaced sites around the circumference of the internal urethral sphincter via an endoscopic technique. In the remaining 3 dogs (control dogs), 1.0 mL of the carrier alone was injected in 3 equally spaced sites around the circumference of the internal urethral sphincter in a similar manner.

Results—For dogs treated with the ECM, median duration of urinary continence following treatment was 168 days (range, 84 to 616 days), whereas for the control dogs, median duration of urinary continence following the procedure was 14 days (range, 7 to 31 days). Two of the 3 control dogs were treated with the ECM at the end of the study and were continent for 119 and 252 days. No adverse effects were observed in any dog.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that endoscopically guided injection of particulate ECM into the internal urethral sphincter may be useful for the treatment of acquired urinary incontinence in female dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1095–1097)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of a particulate bioscaffold consisting of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the urinary bladder from pigs for treatment of acquired urinary incontinence in dogs resistant to medical treatment.

Design—Case series.

Animals—9 female dogs with acquired urinary incontinence.

Procedure—In 6 dogs, 30 mg of particulate ECM in 1.0 mL of a carrier consisting of glycerin and saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was injected into each of 3 equally spaced sites around the circumference of the internal urethral sphincter via an endoscopic technique. In the remaining 3 dogs (control dogs), 1.0 mL of the carrier alone was injected in 3 equally spaced sites around the circumference of the internal urethral sphincter in a similar manner.

Results—For dogs treated with the ECM, median duration of urinary continence following treatment was 168 days (range, 84 to 616 days), whereas for the control dogs, median duration of urinary continence following the procedure was 14 days (range, 7 to 31 days). Two of the 3 control dogs were treated with the ECM at the end of the study and were continent for 119 and 252 days. No adverse effects were observed in any dog.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that endoscopically guided injection of particulate ECM into the internal urethral sphincter may be useful for the treatment of acquired urinary incontinence in female dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1095–1097)

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