Evaluation of serum enzyme activities as predictors of passive transfer status in lambs

Domenico Britti Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Viale F. Crispi 212, I-64100 Teramo, Italy.

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Genesio Massimini Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Viale F. Crispi 212, I-64100 Teramo, Italy.
Present address is San Rocco Private Veterinary Center, Via delle Pesche 9, I-00060 Capena, Rome, Italy.

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Angelo Peli Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bologna Alma Mater Studiorum, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, I-40064 Ozzano Emilia, Italy.

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Alessia Luciani Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Viale F. Crispi 212, I-64100 Teramo, Italy.

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Andrea Boari Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Viale F. Crispi 212, I-64100 Teramo, Italy.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the associations between serum IgG concentration and serum activities of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and pseudocholinesterase for the potential use of these serum enzymes as predictors of passive transfer status in neonatal lambs.

Design—Prospective observational study.

Animals—47 Sardinian lambs from birth to 2 days old.

Procedure—Serum enzyme activities were measured by use of commercially available kits and a clinical biochemical analyzer. Serum IgG concentration was determined by single radial immunodiffusion. Associations between serum IgG concentration and the activity of each serum enzyme were established by use of regression analysis.

Results—A significant correlation was detected between serum IgG concentration and serum GGT activity in 1- and 2-day-old lambs. Minimal correlations were detected between serum IgG concentration and serum alkaline phosphatase activity in 1-dayold lambs and serum pseudocholinesterase activity in 1- and 2-day-old lambs. No significant associations were detected between serum IgG concentration and serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. A multiple linear regression model was accurate for the estimation of the natural logarithm of serum IgG concentration as a function of the natural logarithm of serum GGT activity and of the age of lambs at the time of sampling (adjusted R 2 = 0.89). This model was then used to calculate the serum GGT activity equivalent to various serum IgG concentrations for 1- and 2-day-old lambs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that passive transfer status in neonatal lambs can be successfully predicted by measurement of serum GGT activity but not by measurement of the other enzymes tested. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005; 226:951–955)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the associations between serum IgG concentration and serum activities of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and pseudocholinesterase for the potential use of these serum enzymes as predictors of passive transfer status in neonatal lambs.

Design—Prospective observational study.

Animals—47 Sardinian lambs from birth to 2 days old.

Procedure—Serum enzyme activities were measured by use of commercially available kits and a clinical biochemical analyzer. Serum IgG concentration was determined by single radial immunodiffusion. Associations between serum IgG concentration and the activity of each serum enzyme were established by use of regression analysis.

Results—A significant correlation was detected between serum IgG concentration and serum GGT activity in 1- and 2-day-old lambs. Minimal correlations were detected between serum IgG concentration and serum alkaline phosphatase activity in 1-dayold lambs and serum pseudocholinesterase activity in 1- and 2-day-old lambs. No significant associations were detected between serum IgG concentration and serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. A multiple linear regression model was accurate for the estimation of the natural logarithm of serum IgG concentration as a function of the natural logarithm of serum GGT activity and of the age of lambs at the time of sampling (adjusted R 2 = 0.89). This model was then used to calculate the serum GGT activity equivalent to various serum IgG concentrations for 1- and 2-day-old lambs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that passive transfer status in neonatal lambs can be successfully predicted by measurement of serum GGT activity but not by measurement of the other enzymes tested. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005; 226:951–955)

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