Analgesic efficacy of preoperative administration of meloxicam or butorphanol in onychectomized cats

Gwendolyn L. Carroll Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474.

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 MS, DVM, DACVA
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Lisa B. Howe Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474.

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 DVM, PhD, DACVS
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Kurt D. Peterson Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc, 2621 N Belt Hwy, St Joseph, MO 64506.

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 DVM

Abstract

Objective—To determine analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of preemptive administration of meloxicam or butorphanol in cats undergoing onychectomy or onychectomy and neutering.

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—64 female and 74 male cats that were 4 to 192 months old and weighed 1.09 to 7.05 kg (2.4 to 15.5 lb).

Procedure—Cats received meloxicam (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], SC) or butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg [0.18 mg/lb], SC) 15 minutes after premedication and prior to anesthesia. A single blinded observer measured physiologic variables, assigned analgesia and lameness scores, and withdrew blood samples for each cat at baseline and throughout the 24 hours after surgery. Rescue analgesia (butorphanol, 0.4 mg/kg, IV or SC) or administration of acepromazine (0.025 to 0.05 mg/kg [0.011 to 0.023 mg/lb], IV) was allowed.

Results—Meloxicam-treated cats were less lame and had lower pain scores. Cortisol concentration was higher at extubation and lower at 1, 5, and 12 hours in the meloxicam-treated cats. Fewer meloxicam-treated cats required rescue analgesia at 3, 5, 12, and 24 hours after extubation. General impression scores were excellent or good in 75% of meloxicam-treated cats and 44% of butorphanol-treated cats. There was no treatment effect on buccal bleeding time; PCV and BUN concentration decreased in both groups, and glucose concentration decreased in meloxicam-treated cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preoperative administration of meloxicam improved analgesia for 24 hours without clinically relevant adverse effects in cats that underwent onychectomy or onychectomy and neutering and provided safe, extended analgesia, compared with butorphanol. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:913–919)

Abstract

Objective—To determine analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of preemptive administration of meloxicam or butorphanol in cats undergoing onychectomy or onychectomy and neutering.

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—64 female and 74 male cats that were 4 to 192 months old and weighed 1.09 to 7.05 kg (2.4 to 15.5 lb).

Procedure—Cats received meloxicam (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], SC) or butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg [0.18 mg/lb], SC) 15 minutes after premedication and prior to anesthesia. A single blinded observer measured physiologic variables, assigned analgesia and lameness scores, and withdrew blood samples for each cat at baseline and throughout the 24 hours after surgery. Rescue analgesia (butorphanol, 0.4 mg/kg, IV or SC) or administration of acepromazine (0.025 to 0.05 mg/kg [0.011 to 0.023 mg/lb], IV) was allowed.

Results—Meloxicam-treated cats were less lame and had lower pain scores. Cortisol concentration was higher at extubation and lower at 1, 5, and 12 hours in the meloxicam-treated cats. Fewer meloxicam-treated cats required rescue analgesia at 3, 5, 12, and 24 hours after extubation. General impression scores were excellent or good in 75% of meloxicam-treated cats and 44% of butorphanol-treated cats. There was no treatment effect on buccal bleeding time; PCV and BUN concentration decreased in both groups, and glucose concentration decreased in meloxicam-treated cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preoperative administration of meloxicam improved analgesia for 24 hours without clinically relevant adverse effects in cats that underwent onychectomy or onychectomy and neutering and provided safe, extended analgesia, compared with butorphanol. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:913–919)

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