Surgical reduction and stabilization for repair of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats: 13 cases (1998–2002)

Howard R. Fischer All-Care Animal Referral Center, 18440 Amistad St, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.
present address is Surgical Group for Animals, 3511 Pacific Coast Hwy, Ste A, Torrance, CA 90505.

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Jeffrey Norton All-Care Animal Referral Center, 18440 Amistad St, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.

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Calvin N. Kobluk All-Care Animal Referral Center, 18440 Amistad St, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.
present address is 11550 15th Ave NE, Rice, MN 56367.

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Ann L. Reed All-Care Animal Referral Center, 18440 Amistad St, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.

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Robert L. Rooks All-Care Animal Referral Center, 18440 Amistad St, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.

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Frank Borostyankoi All-Care Animal Referral Center, 18440 Amistad St, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with unilateral or bilateral femoral capital physeal fractures evaluated from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed. Age and weight of cats at the time of surgery; breed; sex; concurrent injuries; severity of lameness before and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after surgery; the amount of fracture reduction achieved and number of Kirschner wires (K-wires) used; degree of degenerative joint disease of the hip joint and lysis of the femoral neck and head observed after surgery; whether K-wires were removed after surgery; and complications after surgery were evaluated.

Results—Thirteen cats with 16 capital physeal fractures were identified. There was significant improvement in the severity of clinical lameness in all cats from weeks 1 through 4 after surgery. There was no correlation between the scores of the individuals who evaluated radiographs for fracture reduction and placement of K-wires.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that surgical stabilization and repair of femoral capital physeal fractures facilitate a short recovery period and a good prognosis for return to normal function in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1478–1482)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with unilateral or bilateral femoral capital physeal fractures evaluated from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed. Age and weight of cats at the time of surgery; breed; sex; concurrent injuries; severity of lameness before and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after surgery; the amount of fracture reduction achieved and number of Kirschner wires (K-wires) used; degree of degenerative joint disease of the hip joint and lysis of the femoral neck and head observed after surgery; whether K-wires were removed after surgery; and complications after surgery were evaluated.

Results—Thirteen cats with 16 capital physeal fractures were identified. There was significant improvement in the severity of clinical lameness in all cats from weeks 1 through 4 after surgery. There was no correlation between the scores of the individuals who evaluated radiographs for fracture reduction and placement of K-wires.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that surgical stabilization and repair of femoral capital physeal fractures facilitate a short recovery period and a good prognosis for return to normal function in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1478–1482)

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