Reports of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and availability of recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in such settings

Jeff B. Bender Veterinary Population Medicine Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Jeff B. Bender in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS, DACVPM
,
Stephanie A. Shulman Veterinary Population Medicine Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Stephanie A. Shulman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
, and
Animals in Public Contact subcommittee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Veterinary Population Medicine Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.
Veterinary Population Medicine Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Animals in Public Contact subcommittee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Animals in Public Contact subcommittee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To assess the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and identify published recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in exhibit settings.

Design—Literature review and survey of state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists.

Procedure—MEDLINE and agriculture databases were searched from 1966 through 2000. Retrieved references and additional resources provided by the authors were reviewed. A survey was sent to state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists to determine whether their states had written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases in animal exhibition venues, whether their states maintained a listing of animal exhibitors in the state, and whether they had any information on recent outbreaks involving animals in exhibitions.

Results—11 published outbreaks were identified. These outbreaks occurred in a variety of settings including petting zoos, farms, and a zoological park. An additional episode involving exposure to a potentially rabid bear required extensive public health resources. A survey of state public health veterinarians identified 16 additional unpublished outbreaks or incidents. Most states did not have written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases or any means to disseminate educational materials to animal exhibitors.

Conclusions—Recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases associated with contact with animals in exhibition venues highlight concerns for disease transmission to public visitors. Only a handful of states have written guidelines for preventing zoonotic disease transmission in animal exhibition venues, and published recommendations currently available focus on preventing enteric diseases and largely do not address other zoonotic diseases or prevention of bite wounds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1105–1109)

Abstract

Objective—To assess the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and identify published recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in exhibit settings.

Design—Literature review and survey of state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists.

Procedure—MEDLINE and agriculture databases were searched from 1966 through 2000. Retrieved references and additional resources provided by the authors were reviewed. A survey was sent to state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists to determine whether their states had written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases in animal exhibition venues, whether their states maintained a listing of animal exhibitors in the state, and whether they had any information on recent outbreaks involving animals in exhibitions.

Results—11 published outbreaks were identified. These outbreaks occurred in a variety of settings including petting zoos, farms, and a zoological park. An additional episode involving exposure to a potentially rabid bear required extensive public health resources. A survey of state public health veterinarians identified 16 additional unpublished outbreaks or incidents. Most states did not have written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases or any means to disseminate educational materials to animal exhibitors.

Conclusions—Recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases associated with contact with animals in exhibition venues highlight concerns for disease transmission to public visitors. Only a handful of states have written guidelines for preventing zoonotic disease transmission in animal exhibition venues, and published recommendations currently available focus on preventing enteric diseases and largely do not address other zoonotic diseases or prevention of bite wounds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1105–1109)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1284 0 0
Full Text Views 1626 1144 242
PDF Downloads 808 548 55
Advertisement