Long-term outcome of cats treated conservatively or surgically for peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia: 66 cases (1987–2002)

S. Brent Reimer Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
Present address is the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Search for other papers by S. Brent Reimer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Andrew E. Kyles Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Andrew E. Kyles in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVMS, PhD
,
Dean E. Filipowicz Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Dean E. Filipowicz in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
, and
Clare R. Gregory Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Clare R. Gregory in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term outcome of cats treated conservatively or surgically for peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—67 cats with PPDH.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with a diagnosis of PPDH made from 1987 through 2002 were reviewed. Information regarding long-term outcome was obtained from owners.

Results—Prevalences of PPDH in domestic longhair and Himalayan cats were significantly greater and prevalence of PPDH in domestic shorthair cats was significantly lower than prevalence of PPDH in the hospital cat population over the 15-year study period. Historical problems most commonly related to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia was the primary diagnosis in 40 cats and an incidental finding in 27 cats. One cat died prior to arrival at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Thirty-seven of 66 cats were treated surgically, and 29 were treated conservatively. The postoperative mortality rate was 14%. Postoperative complications developed in 29 of 37 cats, the most common of which was hyperthermia. Two of 22 conservatively treated cats had progression of clinical signs necessitating surgical intervention or resulting in death. Owner satisfaction with treatment choice and long-term outcome was rated as very satisfied by 88% of owners of surgically treated cats and 68% of owners of conservatively treated cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cats with overt clinical signs attributable to PPDH are good candidates for surgical herniorrhaphy. Postoperative complications may develop but are generally minor and self-limiting. Long-term outcome of cats treated conservatively or surgically was rated as very good by most owners. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:728–732)

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term outcome of cats treated conservatively or surgically for peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—67 cats with PPDH.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with a diagnosis of PPDH made from 1987 through 2002 were reviewed. Information regarding long-term outcome was obtained from owners.

Results—Prevalences of PPDH in domestic longhair and Himalayan cats were significantly greater and prevalence of PPDH in domestic shorthair cats was significantly lower than prevalence of PPDH in the hospital cat population over the 15-year study period. Historical problems most commonly related to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia was the primary diagnosis in 40 cats and an incidental finding in 27 cats. One cat died prior to arrival at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Thirty-seven of 66 cats were treated surgically, and 29 were treated conservatively. The postoperative mortality rate was 14%. Postoperative complications developed in 29 of 37 cats, the most common of which was hyperthermia. Two of 22 conservatively treated cats had progression of clinical signs necessitating surgical intervention or resulting in death. Owner satisfaction with treatment choice and long-term outcome was rated as very satisfied by 88% of owners of surgically treated cats and 68% of owners of conservatively treated cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cats with overt clinical signs attributable to PPDH are good candidates for surgical herniorrhaphy. Postoperative complications may develop but are generally minor and self-limiting. Long-term outcome of cats treated conservatively or surgically was rated as very good by most owners. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:728–732)

Advertisement