Case-control study of blood type, breed, sex, and bacteremia in dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia

Sybille A. Miller Department of Medicine, The Bobst Hospital, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021-8302.
Present address is The Marlboro Animal Hospital, 441 Lakeside Ave, Marlboro, MA 01752.

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 DVM, DACVIM
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Ann E. Hohenhaus Department of Medicine, The Bobst Hospital, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021-8302.

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Anne S. Hale Midwest Animal Blood Services Inc, PO Box 626, 120 E Main St, Ste 1, Stockbridge, MI 49285.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether blood type, breed, or sex were risk factors for immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in dogs and whether bacteremia was common in dogs with IMHA.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—33 dogs with IMHA, 1,014 dogs without IMHA for which blood type (dog erythrocyte antigens 1.1, 1.2, 3, 4, 5, and 7) was known, 15,668 dogs without IMHA for which breed was known, and 15,589 dogs without IMHA for which sex was known.

Procedure—Blood type, breed, and sex distribution of dogs with IMHA were compared with data for control dogs with Fisher exact tests and by calculating odds ratios (ORs). Results of bacterial culture of blood samples were documented for dogs with IMHA, when available.

Results—Dog erythrocyte antigen 7 was associated with a significant protective effect (OR, 0.1) in Cocker Spaniels with IMHA (n = 10), compared with control dogs. Cocker Spaniels, Bichon Frise, Miniature Pinschers, Rough-coated Collies, and Finnish Spitz had a significantly increased risk of IMHA, as did female dogs (OR, 2.1). Blood samples from 12 dogs with IMHA were submitted for bacterial culture, and none had bacteremia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that blood type, breed, and sex may play a role in IMHA in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:232–235)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether blood type, breed, or sex were risk factors for immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in dogs and whether bacteremia was common in dogs with IMHA.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—33 dogs with IMHA, 1,014 dogs without IMHA for which blood type (dog erythrocyte antigens 1.1, 1.2, 3, 4, 5, and 7) was known, 15,668 dogs without IMHA for which breed was known, and 15,589 dogs without IMHA for which sex was known.

Procedure—Blood type, breed, and sex distribution of dogs with IMHA were compared with data for control dogs with Fisher exact tests and by calculating odds ratios (ORs). Results of bacterial culture of blood samples were documented for dogs with IMHA, when available.

Results—Dog erythrocyte antigen 7 was associated with a significant protective effect (OR, 0.1) in Cocker Spaniels with IMHA (n = 10), compared with control dogs. Cocker Spaniels, Bichon Frise, Miniature Pinschers, Rough-coated Collies, and Finnish Spitz had a significantly increased risk of IMHA, as did female dogs (OR, 2.1). Blood samples from 12 dogs with IMHA were submitted for bacterial culture, and none had bacteremia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that blood type, breed, and sex may play a role in IMHA in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:232–235)

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