Effects of a whole-body spandex garment on rectal temperature and oxygen consumption in healthy dogs

S. Brent Reimer Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
Present address is Michigan State University, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Search for other papers by S. Brent Reimer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Kurt S. Schulz Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Kurt S. Schulz in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS, DACVS
,
David R. Mason Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
Present address is the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Search for other papers by David R. Mason in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVet Med
, and
James H. Jones Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by James H. Jones in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD, DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a full-body spandex garment would alter rectal temperatures of healthy dogs at rest in cool and warm environments.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—10 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was evaluated at a low (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]) or high (30° to 35°C [86° to 95°F]) ambient temperature while wearing or not wearing a commercially available whole-body spandex garment designed for dogs. Oxygen consumption was measured by placing dogs in a flow-through indirect calorimeter for 90 to 120 minutes. Rectal temperature was measured before dogs were placed in the calorimeter and after they were removed.

Results—Rectal temperature increased significantly more at the higher ambient temperature than at the lower temperature and when dogs were not wearing the garment than when they were wearing it. The specific rate of oxygen consumption was significantly higher at the lower ambient temperature than at the higher temperature.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that wearing a snug spandex body garment does not increase the possibility that dogs will overheat while in moderate ambient temperatures. Instead, wearing such a garment may enable dogs to better maintain body temperature during moderate heat loading. These results suggest that such garments might be used for purposes such as wound or suture protection without causing dogs to overheat. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:71–74)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a full-body spandex garment would alter rectal temperatures of healthy dogs at rest in cool and warm environments.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—10 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was evaluated at a low (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]) or high (30° to 35°C [86° to 95°F]) ambient temperature while wearing or not wearing a commercially available whole-body spandex garment designed for dogs. Oxygen consumption was measured by placing dogs in a flow-through indirect calorimeter for 90 to 120 minutes. Rectal temperature was measured before dogs were placed in the calorimeter and after they were removed.

Results—Rectal temperature increased significantly more at the higher ambient temperature than at the lower temperature and when dogs were not wearing the garment than when they were wearing it. The specific rate of oxygen consumption was significantly higher at the lower ambient temperature than at the higher temperature.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that wearing a snug spandex body garment does not increase the possibility that dogs will overheat while in moderate ambient temperatures. Instead, wearing such a garment may enable dogs to better maintain body temperature during moderate heat loading. These results suggest that such garments might be used for purposes such as wound or suture protection without causing dogs to overheat. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:71–74)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 56 0 0
Full Text Views 457 442 79
PDF Downloads 28 14 1
Advertisement